olfactory region of mucosa of nose

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Related to Olfactory mucosa: olfactory epithelium, respiratory mucosa

olfactory region of mucosa of nose

[TA]
epithelium containing nerve cells with axons that form the filaments of the olfactory nerve; the lamina propria contains numerous olfactory glands (Bowman) that open to the surface.
Synonym(s): olfactory mucosa
References in periodicals archive ?
Lu, "Olfactory mucosa: a rich source of cell therapy for central nervous system repair," Reviews in the Neurosciences, vol.
The choice of bulk olfactory mucosa rather than purified olfactory ensheathing cells or stem cells as an autograft may lead to the development of a mass containing functional respiratory mucosal cells.
When sampling of the transplanted OECs in to the spinal cord needs to be removed for transplantation studies from olfactory mucosa, it resulted in permanent damage to olfaction (smelling).
Loss of smell due to head trauma, toxic exposures or viral infections that damage the olfactory mucosa may return over time, but if there is no improvement in six to 12 months, the condition is generally permanent.
ISOLATION OF OLFACTORY ENSHEATHING CELLS FROM OLFACTORY BULB AND OLFACTORY MUCOSA
Lima's study included seven patients who received the olfactory mucosa transplants between July 2001 and March 2003.
Oral cavity, tongue, tonsils, epiglottis, pharynx, larynx and vocal cords, trachea and bronchial air conducting tubes, nasal cavity, olfactory mucosa, and sinuses
In addressing the superior turbinate surgically, one must be cognizant not only of its anatomic relationships, but also its role in the distribution of olfactory mucosa. The structure should be manipulated gently because an aggressive debridement might damage the olfactory mucosa or disrupt the cribriform plate and cause a cerebrospinal fluid leak.
Carlos Lima, MD, Egas Moniz Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, shares some insights on olfactory mucosa autografts (OMA).
Because nasally instilled material is readily aspirated into the lower respiratory tract in rodents, thus making olfactory mucosa exposure less than optimal, we developed a simple method to maximize the dose to the olfactory mucosa.