Olduvai Gorge


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Olduvai Gorge

A steep 48-km ravine in the Serengeti Plains of eastern Africa which was allegedly discovered by a German butterfly collector in 1911, who fell down the side of the ravine and a vast collection of fossils, bones and artefacts about ancient man’s evolution. The first serious excavation of the site began with Louis and Mary Leakey in 1931, and continues with others.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As part of the exhibition, visitors can also handle stone tools, made in Tanzania's Olduvai Gorge 2-1.5 million years ago.
Other highlights of the trip, by 4WD expedition truck, include Lake Manyara, Ngorongoro Crater and Olduvai Gorge, home of mankind's first ancestor.
He was talking about discoveries in the Olduvai Gorge that traced human evolution back over a million years.
While they were discovering ancient pre-human bones in Tanzania's Olduvai Gorge, Richard was spending his time observing and tracking Africa's rich diversity of wildlife.
It was only in the 1950s, with the fossil findings of Mary and Louis Leakey at Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania, that scientists were able to ascertain that humankind first appeared in Africa, not Asia as many believed.
Several psychological and sociological works have been published which look at gay life from about the same distance as the Leakeys watched the fossil families of Australopithecines in Olduvai Gorge.
A first look at the strapping arms and legs of an unusual member of the human evolutionary family has arisen from new fossil finds at Tanzania's famous Olduvai Gorge site.
Olduvai Gorge in Tanzania already attracts many people because of its impressive archaeological discoveries.
The discovery at Olduvai Gorge, made by a global team of researchers led by Manuel Dominguez-Rodrigo from Complutense University, Madrid, suggests that early human ancestors began eating meat much earlier in history than previously believed.
A prodigious writer of books for children and young adults, Bowman-Kruhm (education, Johns Hopkins U.) here profiles three generations of the first family of first humans--the premier archaeologists findings and interpreting fossils remains from the Olduvai Gorge in East Africa.