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star

(star),
Any stellate or star-shaped structure.
See also: aster, astrosphere, stella, stellula.
[A.S. steorra]

STAR

Abbreviation for:
Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement
Short-Term Assessment and Rehabilitation team 
signal transduction and activation of RNA
Special Targeted, Abbreviated Review
Specialty Training and Advanced Research
staged abdominal repair
Staphylokinase Recombinant Trial
Start Talking About Recovery
steroidogenic acute regulatory protein 
Study of Tamoxifen and Raloxifene
Systems Test for Alternative Reimbursement

STAR

Oncology A 5-yr clinical study–Study of Tamoxifen And Raloxifene–to determine whether raloxifene helps prevent breast CA in ♀ and whether it has any benefits over tamoxifen–Nolvadex. See MORE, Raloxifene, Tamoxifen.

star

(stahr)
Any stellate structure.
See also: aster, astrosphere, stella, stellula
[A.S. steorra]

STAR,

n an acronym used in osteopathic medicine that represents “sensitivity,” “tissue texture change,” “asymmetry,” and “range of motion reduced.” STAR prompts practitioners to remember the indications of somatic dysfunction, including those associated with myofascial trigger points.

STAR

see cornell STAR accelerated lambing system.

star

a color marking in a horse's coat consisting of a white spot in the center of the forehead; just a few white hairs is sometimes called a flame.
References in periodicals archive ?
That problem has been resolved: The age of the universe crept up while age estimates for the oldest stars drifted down.
Globular clusters are thought to harbour some of the oldest stars in our galaxy, born when the Universe was just a small fraction of its current age.
The oldest stars in the Milky Way may be much younger, and the cosmos slightly older, than astronomers had thought (151: 101).
Some of the oldest stars in the Milky Way - a kind of stellar fossils in the outer reaches of our galaxy, contain abnormally large amounts of heavy elements like gold, platinum and uranium.
The oldest stars in the Milky Way may be considerably younger than astronomers had thought, and the universe about 1 billion years older, according to a new analysis of stellar data from the Hipparcos satellite.
Whether it's truly a crisis in cosmology or just a matter of incomplete knowledge, astronomers are up against a conundrum: The universe, according to several observations, appears to be younger than its oldest stars.
Located in the dwarf galaxy Sculptor some 290,000 light-years away, the star has a remarkably similar chemical make-up to the Milky Way's oldest stars.
Yet another set of observations indicates that the universe--as described by a popular cosmological model--appears to be younger than its oldest stars.
We found the oldest stars in a few ancient globular star clusters that date back to about 10 billion years ago.
On the other hand, astronomers estimate the ages of our galaxy's oldest stars at 13 billion to 16 billion years.
That poses a predicament because it makes the universe appear younger than its oldest stars, believed to be 16 billion years old.
Globular clusters have some of the oldest stars in the universe.