olanzapine

(redirected from Olanzepine)
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olanzapine

 [o-lan´zah-pēn]
a monoaminergic antagonist used as an antipsychotic agent; administered orally.

olanzapine

/olan·za·pine/ (o-lan´zah-pēn) a monoaminergic antagonist used as an antipsychotic.

olanzapine

(ə-lăn′zə-pēn′)
n.
A psychotropic drug, C17H20N4S, used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and acute psychosis.

olanzapine

an antipsychotic and neuroleptic.
indications It is used to treat psychotic disorders.
contraindication Known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a rare but life-threatening effect. Other adverse effects are orthostatic hypotension, tachycardia, chest pain, blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, constipation, abdominal pain, weight gain, urinary retention, urinary frequency, enuresis, impotence, amenorrhea, gynecomastia, breast engorgement, premenstrual syndrome, rash, dyspnea, rhinitis, cough, pharyngitis, extrapyramidal symptoms, seizures, headache, fever, insomnia, somnolence, agitation, nervousness, hostility, dizziness, hypertonia, tremor, euphoria, joint pain, and twitching.

olanzapine

A thienobenzodiazepine drug used to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA. it is similar to CLOZAPINE. A brand name is Zyprexa.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two case reports describe the use of olanzepine in patients with psychotic symptoms post-TBI.
On the other hand, quetiapine (Seroquel), risperidone, olanzepine (Zyprexa), and occasionally depakote may work for delirious or combative patients when more usual approaches fail.
Olanzepine treatment of children, adolescents, and adults with pervasive developmental disorders: An open-label pilot study.
A preliminary, double-blind, placebocontrolled laboratory study of the recently approved antipsychotic medication olanzepine (Zyprexa(r)) on alcohol-induced stimulation and cue-induced craving found that pretreatment with olanzepine attenuated measures of alcohol- and cue-induced craving (Hutchison et al.