emulsion

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emulsion

 [e-mul´shun]
a mixture of two immiscible liquids, one being dispersed throughout the other in small droplets; a colloid system in which both the dispersed phase and the dispersion medium are liquids. Margarine, cold cream, and various medicated ointments are emulsions. In some emulsions the suspended particles tend to join together and settle out; hence the container must be shaken each time the emulsion is used.
film emulsion a dehydrated gel emulsion of light- or radiation-sensitive silver halide that is applied to a suitable base.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn),
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase) (for example, oil in water [milk] or water in oil [mayonnaise]).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

emulsion

Pharmacology A suspension of droplets of one liquid in another–eg, oil, water. See Emulsifier.

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of very small globules (internal phase), throughout the other (external phase).
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]

e·mul·sion

(ē-mŭl'shŭn)
A system containing two immiscible liquids in which one is dispersed, in the form of small globules, throughout the other.
[Mod. L. fr. e-mulgeo, pp. -mulsus, to milk or drain out]
References in periodicals archive ?
Suphantharika, Influence of different [beta]-glucans on the physical and rheological properties of egg yolk stabilized oil-in-water emulsions, Food Hydrocollo., 23, 1279 (2009).
But the multilayer oil-in-water emulsion was stable at the same pH and retained, to a greater extent, the hydrophobic VOCs.
McClements, "Ultrasonic determination of depletion flocculation in oil-in-water emulsions containing a non-ionic surfactant," Colloids and Surfaces A-Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, vol.
STA-CAP [R] 661 is recommended for use in applications requiring the stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions. This starch is used in fruit drinks to encapsulate flavor or add cloud.
IN addition, the unit is ideal for efficient processing of pharmaceutical formulations, fine chemicals, and biological material ranging from simple oil-in-water emulsions to highly immiscible solids-in-liquid suspensions will result.
That's because these products are oil-in-water emulsions. Since the water is the continuous phase, it's easier to incorporate water-dispersible thickeners, such as gums or starch, into the formulation.
This ingredient can be formulated into oil-in-water emulsions, water-in-oil emulsions, dispersions, and other formulating systems.
Oil-in-water emulsions were prepared with different interfacial properties: lactoferrin only, beta-lactoglobulin only; lactoferrin and beta-lactoglobulin; beta-lactoglobulin and lactoferrin; and mixed beta-lactoglobulin and lactoferrin.
Aggregation Phenomena includes: Aggregation Processes, Particle Interactions, and Colloidal Structure; High Pressure Processing of Beta-Lactoglobulin and Bovine Serum Albumin; Ultrasonic Characterization of Flocculation in Oil-in-Water Emulsions; Measuring Aggregation in Colloids using Ultrasound Velocity and Attenuation; Structure of Fat Crystal Aggregates.
In the Massachusetts research, several oil-in-water emulsions were prepared with different interfacial properties.
Ethanolic extracts produced from the pomace of each grape variety were added to bulk soybean oil as well as oil-in-water emulsions to determine the antioxidant activity of the extracts in lipid systems.
In order to optimize this property, during the past 25 years hydrocarbon and emollient oil-in-water emulsions have evolved to silicone-in-water emulsions, to the incorporation of volatile silicones and oils for "lightness" and eventually to water-in-silicone emulsions.