peak oil

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peak oil

The maximum in production of oil, the energy-rich, highly versatile and easily transportable fuel.

The impact of oil on healthcare is only recently being recognised. The healthcare conclusions in the report commissioned by leaders in Bristol (UK) are that oil is the primary raw material for many drugs, equipment and supplies; that transport of patients, staff, deliveries and service are heavily dependent on oil; that suppliers are not required to provide business continuity plans in the event of fuel shortages; and rising oil costs would seriously affect health service budgets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the February 2005 release of the Hirsch report, two events have underlined suspicions of an imminent oil peak.
So it's business as usual, with the politicians in denial, until we finally see the oil peak in the rear-view mirror.
Public understanding about the ecological and socio-economical consequences of an oil peak is alarmingly low.
In 1977 the Workshop on Alternative Energy Strategies forecast the global oil peak as early as 1990 and most likely between 1994 and 1997.
Joint Forces Command forecast a worldwide oil peak by 2015, and observed that the effects "surely would reduce the prospects for growth in both the developing and developed worlds.
Using similar calculations, numerous experts - including Bush administration energy advisor Matthew Simmons - predict that the global oil peak is virtually upon us.
Supply concerns just as winter demand for oil peaks will keep prices supported, but the outlook remains weak, partly because a surge in US crude production is reducing the world's top oil consumer's reliance on imports, Nunan said.
Even if conventional oil peaks, oil derived from other fossil fuels can flow for decades.
US refiners' demand for crude oil peaks in mid-July, easing off in the autumn and rising to lower heights if the winter is mild or to a peak if the cold is severe.
I see this bullish potential despite the present oil peaks due to political unrest in the Middle East and despite Last Friday's tragic earthquake in Japan, with estimated material and opportunity costs of the order of $10 Billion that seem to me underestimated at least by a factor of five to ten.
According to Hughes, "Depending upon how quickly the transportation sector begins its migration away from oil dependence, we could find ourselves at a tipping point in which demand for oil peaks much earlier than the industry currently anticipates, before going into long-term decline.
West Midland manufacturers have shown some resilience in difficult conditions, but if crude oil peaks at EUR150 a barrel, as one report suggested, they are going to find 2008 challenging, Mr Bowker warned.