oil immersion lens

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oil immersion lens

A special lens with oil placed between the lens and the object being visualized. This eliminates a layer of air between the microscope slide and the lens, producing a clearer image than if the oil were not used.
See also: lens
References in periodicals archive ?
We requested microscopic analysis (with an oil immersion objective lens at 1,000x) of earlobe skin samples.
Measurements were taken from 30 oocysts under an oil immersion objective (Duszynski and Wilber, 1997) within 6 wk after they had completed sporulation, and these are reported in micrometers ([micro]m) with means followed by the ranges in parentheses.
Tape impression smears collected from ears revealed budding yeast cells under oil immersion objective after staining with new methylene blue (Fig.
Even in moderately preserved specimens the taenae were partly or totally corroded and could only be identified by their faint outline detectable under oil immersion objective.
Gram's Stain: A drop of uncentrifuged, well mixed urine was taken on a clean grease-free slide and stained by Gram's staining and examined under the oil immersion objective of the microscope (examining 20 fields).
He also talks of his "disastrous" year in neuropathology and neurochemistry: "I screwed the oil immersion objective of the microscope through several priceless slides.
"Resolution of morphologic detail adequate to permit reasonably reliable identification of parasites and discrimination among parasite species requires use of a 100X oil immersion objective," says Shapiro, who remains unconvinced about how well the new technology can reliably identify the presence of malaria, if at all.
The smears were graded using 100 x oil immersion objective as per RNTCP guidelines (1): Scanty = 1- 9 AFB in 100 oil immersion fields (field); 1 + = 10 - 99 AFB in 100 fields; 2+ = 1 to 9 AFB per field in at least 50 fields; 3+ = 10 or more AFB per field in at least 20 fields; Neg = no AFB in 100 fields.
Carl Zeiss Jena produced its first oil immersion objective in 1880, designed by Ernst Abbe, who was the founder of the optical theory of microscope lenses.
* The oil immersion objective lens is rotated into viewing position (because I want to see the student switch to the scanning or 10X objective lens, focus, and then move to a higher power objective).
They provide higher resolution and brighter images when imaging within deep samples when compared with oil immersion objectives, and are useful in long-term imaging experiments where, in the past, water evaporation has been an issue.