Ohm's law

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Related to Ohms Law: Kirchoff's Law

Ohm's law

 [ōmz]
a mathematical relationship formulated by the German physicist Georg Simon Ohm in 1826, comparing voltage (V), current (I), and resistance (R), usable for either alternating current or direct current. It originally applied only to situations of steady direct current, with the formula V = IR; with alternating current, the electrical circuit contains resistors, inductors, and capacitors and the formula becomes V = IZ, where Z is a complex number representing the impedance.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Ohm's law

(omz)
[Georg S. Ohm, Ger. physicist, 1789–1854]
The strength of an electric current, expressed in amperes, is equal to the electromotive force, expressed in volts, divided by the resistance, expressed in ohms (V=IR).
See: electricity
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References in periodicals archive ?
And even today - after all these years - I swear I can't utter 'ohms law' or 'electronic circuits' without feeling a certain irrational dread.