Ohm's law


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Related to Ohm's law: Kirchoff's Law

Ohm's law

 [ōmz]
a mathematical relationship formulated by the German physicist Georg Simon Ohm in 1826, comparing voltage (V), current (I), and resistance (R), usable for either alternating current or direct current. It originally applied only to situations of steady direct current, with the formula V = IR; with alternating current, the electrical circuit contains resistors, inductors, and capacitors and the formula becomes V = IZ, where Z is a complex number representing the impedance.

Ohm's law

Etymology: Georg S. Ohm
the principle that the strength or intensity of an unvarying electric current is directly proportional to the electromotive force and inversely proportional to the resistance of the circuit.

Ohm's law

(omz)
[Georg S. Ohm, Ger. physicist, 1789–1854]
The strength of an electric current, expressed in amperes, is equal to the electromotive force, expressed in volts, divided by the resistance, expressed in ohms (V=IR).
See: electricity

Ohm's law

the electric current flowing through a conductor is equal to the voltage divided by the resistance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ohm's law relationship observed at lower voltages in this material is consistent with the fundamental nature of the space-charge-limited emission mechanism, and can be explained by the presence of thermal free carriers from localized defect states.
Linear regions with two different slopes observed on a log-log scale could explain this behavior, where at lower voltages the charge transport mechanism is consistent with Ohm's law but at higher voltages the charge transport is consistent with Child's law of space-charge-limited emission.
Ohm's law can be written in terms of the electrical resistance R of a particular conductor as
The digestion of Eq 4 can perhaps best be gained through three ideas: the average conduction current-coordination number relation; its use in an equivalent first node to adjacent node circuit; and Ohm's law applied to the voltage difference in that circuit (which can be inverted for the final expression).
For example, while Ohm's Law describes the inevitable dissipation of power as charge currents flow, a recent generalized theory by Zhang and colleagues predicts that generating a spin current by an electric field can be reversible and non-dissipative.