Ogilvie's syndrome

Ogilvie's syndrome

Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction resulting in massive dilatation of the bowel in the absence of any luminal blockage. The condition, wgich may be life-threatening, is a form of local adynamic ileus and most commonly follows surgical procedures. It is thought to be caused by excessive sympathetic stimulation, parasympathetic malfunction, or both.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (ACPO) disease, also known as Ogilvie's syndrome, is defined as the abnormal dilatation of the colon, although no mechanical obstruction is present (2).
Also, it was stated that Ogilvie's syndrome might be a variant of CIRCI.
The acute colonic pseudoobstruction (ACPO), nonobstructive colonic dilatation, or Ogilvie's syndrome is a rare entity that is characterized by acute dilatation of the colon, usually involving caecum and right hemicolon in the absence of any mechanical obstruction (80-90%), abdominal pain (80%), abdominal tenderness (62%), nausea and/or vomiting (60%), constipation (40%), and fever (37%).
Ogilvie's syndrome or ACPO was first reported by Sir Ogilvie in 1948 [1].
Case reports: A rare complication after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: Ogilvie's syndrome. Cardiovascular Journal of Africa.
Acute Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction (Ogilvie's Syndrome).
Demonstration of varicella-zoster virus infection in the muscularis propria and myenteric plexi of the colon in an HIV-positive patient with herpes zoster and small bowel pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie's syndrome).
Acute colonic pseudoobstruction (ACPO), also known as Ogilvie's syndrome, is characterized by distension of the colon in the absence of a mechanical obstruction.
Rare cases of gastrointestinal (GI) perforation have been reported in advanced illness patients with conditions that may be associated with localized or diffuse reduction of structural integrity in the wall of the GI tract (i.e., cancer, peptic ulcer, Ogilvie's syndrome).
After a purely elective surgery to replace a hip, Fred developed an almost always fatal condition called Ogilvie's syndrome. He died on February 28, 2008.
His general state did not deteriorate, and the Ogilvie's syndrome was managed non-operatively (bowel decompression by rectal tube, fluid and electrolyte correction, and withdrawal of propranolol).
Ogilvie's syndrome post hysterectomy: a case report and literature review