rare disease

(redirected from Office of Rare Diseases)
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rare disease

See Orphan disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases, there are 6,000 to 7,000 rare diseases affecting a total of 25 million Americans.
Information: Giovanna Spinella, Office of Rare Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Boulevard, MSC-7518, Bethesda, MD 20892-7518 USA, 301-496-0139, fax: 301-480-9655, e-mail: Giovanna.
Groft, who heads the National Institutes of Health's Office of Rare Diseases, said, "The Orphan Drug Act led to the development of 260 products, which have been approved by the U.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), Office of Rare Diseases (ORD), and SWF, Bethesda, MD, $7,500 for "Angiogenesis in the Nervous System Workshop.
The National Institutes of Health Office of Rare Diseases Research supports a network of rare disease collaboratives to accelerate treatment development.
28 with a day-long celebration co-sponsored by the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research and the NIH Clinical Center.
Sponsors included the NIEHS, the Society for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Urban Public Health Program of Hunter College, the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Public Health, and the NIH of Office of Rare Diseases.
The National Genome Research Institute and the National Institute of Health's Office of Rare Diseases have launched the Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center.
Director of the Office of Rare Diseases, National Institutes of Health (NIH); Peter Dudley, Ph.
NIH Office of Rare Diseases (ORD), "NIH Announces Licensing Opportunities for Rare Disease Technologies" December 11, 2006
The NIEHS, with the NIH Office of Rare Diseases, the U.
A 1998 conference on laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease convened by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) recommended that "only bacterial antigens derived from OspA-deficient mutant of Borrelia burgdorferi be used in all diagnostic assays to circumvent false positive reactions likely to result from the use of OspA Lyme vaccines.

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