Office of Alternative Medicine


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Office of Alternative Medicine

A section of the NIH established in 1992 by the US Congress, the purpose of which is to investigate the claims of efficacy for various forms of alternative therapy, and their possible health benefits; it was replaced in 1998 by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine
References in periodicals archive ?
Even if you go back to 1992 when the Office of Alternative Medicine was created," says Johns Hopkins professor of biomedical engineering Steven L.
In 1999, because of confusion and controversy over terminology, Congress changed the title from Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) to National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM).
But practically since it established the Office of Alternative Medicine in 1992, it has come under fire from the medical establishment for funding what critics charge are shoddy experimental procedures.
moreover, has always bubbled with what the Office of Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health designates "community-based health care practices.
In February 1998, the NIH Office of Alternative Medicine, along with six NIH institutes, including NIAMS and NINDS, and the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, issued a PA entitled "Acupuncture Clinical Trial Pilot Grants.
Congress created and financed NIH's Office of Alternative Medicine, which is already holding medical seminars on acupuncture and nonpharmacological pain relief.
In 1992 the National Institutes of Health created the Office of Alternative Medicine to research and evaluate unconventional medical practices.
government four years ago with the establishment of the Office of Alternative Medicine as a branch of the National Institutes of Health.
Aside from recognition by the FDA and the development of the Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) at the National Institutes of Health, another sign of mainstream acceptance is the development of alternative insurance riders.
In 1992, the National Institutes of Health created an Office of Alternative Medicine (OAM) to evaluate therapies ranging from homeopathy and music therapy to acupuncture.
With so many people spending so much money on unconventional medical treatments these days, it's perhaps not surprising that the National Institutes of Health will soon begin looking into the safety and efficacy of alternative therapies under the auspices of its new Office of Alternative Medicine.
He also served as the first Chair of the Program Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health's Office of Alternative Medicine and is a former member of the Cancer Advisory Panel on Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the National Institutes of Health.

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