Oedipus


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Related to Oedipus: Oedipus Rex

Oedipus,

King Oedipus of Thebes, mythical Greek hero.
oedipism - (1) self-infliction of injury to the eyes; - (2) manifestation of the Oedipus complex.
Oedipus complex - a phase of psychosexual development in which the child is erotically attached to the parent of the opposite sex and has feelings of aggression toward the same-sex parent.
Oedipus period - the time of a child's development characterized by erotic attachment to the parent of the opposite sex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the original production of Oedipus the King, which apparently took place in Athens in 427 BCE, we know next to nothing.
SOPHOCLES'S Oedipus the King has been variously categorized as a tragedy of fate, of incest, of ignorance and knowing.
After all, it was "obvious" that Oedipus unwittingly murdered his father, King Laius of Thebes, at a crossroads.
Oedipus is the son of Laius, King of Thebes, and his wife Jocasta, who is abandoned to die as a baby to foil a curse which says he will murder his father and marry his mother.
This is because the cases reported to date have come from a wide range of cultures, including China and Japan, and none described events remotely similar to Oedipus Rex.
Oedipus Rex, apart from the undeniable literary and historic value, also presents significant medical interest because the play mentions a plague, an epidemic, which was devastating Thebes, the town of Oedipus' hegemony.
I have acted in the Yeats version of Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus, I have directed the Frank McGuinness version of Euripides' Hecuba, and I have devoted considerable critical attention to Seamus Heaney's version of Sophocles' Philoctetes, aptly named The Cure At Troy.
By recalling that scene, Socrates suggests that Sophocles--like Oedipus, Cephalus, and Solon--never escaped the many mad masters that conquer and divide the tyrannical psyche.
the images on which, at the very end, the camera focuses are the same as those on which it focuses at the very beginning: a jewel of nature that, as in the cradle, held the infant Oedipus, and likewise holds him at the end of his life.
A few articles have considered the presence of Greek material in Hebrew, most notably, Glenda Abramson's "Hellenism Revisited: The Uses of Greek Myth in Modern Hebrew Literature" (Prooftexts, 1990) and Dwora Gilula's "The First Greek Drama on the Hebrew Stage: Tyrone Guthrie's Oedipus Rex and the Habima" (Theatre Research International, 1988).
After he had waited for others, the more impatient ones, to tackle topics of lesser or greater significance, here came the turn of the Sphinx, who wanted to get the better of Oedipus (for he was able to ask difficult questions): "For the Alpha-Pi news agency, a statement, Your Majesty.
No element, such as the sexual element, can be comprehended save in its relationship with other elements; for example with the determination with which Oedipus pursues his inquiry into the crime despite the warnings of Tiresias (Bion 1963:45).