Oedipus complex

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Oedipus complex

 [ed´ĭ-pus]
a term used originally in psychoanalysis to signify the complicated conflicts and emotions felt by a child when, during a stage of his normal development as a member of the family circle, he becomes aware of a particularly strong, sexually tinged attachment to his mother; the term also applies to a similar attachment felt by a girl to her father (called also Electra complex). At the same time, the child tends to view the other parent as a rival and yearns to take that parent's place. This pattern, which was described by Sigmund Freud, is named from the legend of the mythical Greek hero, King Oedipus of Thebes, who was raised by foster parents, unknowingly killed his real father in a quarrel, and later married his mother. When he learned of his unwitting incestuous relationship with his wife he blinded himself.

According to psychoanalysts, a child enters the oedipal phase at about the third year and usually has solved his largely unconscious conflicts in a satisfactory way by the age of 5 or 6. He does this by turning his feelings of possessiveness toward one parent and competitiveness toward the other into a wish to be liked by both of them. Eventually, a child who has worked out his conflicts well can focus his affection on members of the opposite sex outside the family circle and can establish satisfactory marital relationships as an adult.

Freud's theory is generally accepted by psychiatrists, although many have developed supplementary theories for the behavior pattern he described.

Oed·i·pus com·plex

(e'di-pŭs, ē'),
a developmentally distinct group of associated ideas, aims, instinctual drives, and fears generally observed in boys 3-6 years old: coinciding with the peak of the phallic phase of psychosexual development, the child's sexual interest is attached primarily to the parent of the opposite gender and is accompanied by aggressive feelings toward the parent of the same gender; in psychoanalytic theory, it is replaced by the castration complex.
[Oedipus, G. myth. char.]

Oedipus complex

n.
In psychoanalysis, an unconscious sexual desire by a child, especially a male child, directed to the parent of the opposite sex, usually accompanied by hostility to the parent of the same sex.

Oedipus complex

[ed′ipəs, ē′dəpəs]
Etymology: Gk, Oedipus, mythic king who slew his father and married his mother
1 (in psychoanalysis) a child's desire for a sexual relationship with the parent of the opposite sex, usually with strong negative feelings for the parent of the same sex.
2 a son's desire for a sexual relationship with his mother. Compare Electra complex. See also phallic stage.

Oedipus complex

Psychiatry Normal attachment of a child to the parent of the opposite sex, accompanied by envious and aggressive feelings toward a same-sex parent; the OC is a constellation of consequences–per Freud–resulting from the sublimation of a boy's psychosexual desire for his mother, likened to Oedipus of Greek mythology, who killed his father and married his mother. See Jocasta complex.

Oed·i·pus com·plex

(ed'i-pŭs kom'pleks)
A group of associated ideas, aims, instinctual drives, and fears in male children 3-6 years old; at the peak of the phallic phase of psychosexual development, the child's sexual interest is attached primarily to the mother and is accompanied by aggressive feelings toward the father; in psychoanalytic theory, it is replaced by the castration complex.
[Oedipus, G. myth. char.]

oedipus complex

The Freudian belief that much psychiatric disorder, especially the ‘psychoneuroses’, are caused by the persisting effects, including unresolved guilt feelings, of the child's unconscious wish to kill the parent of the same sex and to have sexual intercourse with the parent of the opposite sex. The notion was one of the central tenets of Freudian dogma but is no longer widely held. Freud derived the term from the name of the swollen-footed, mythical hero of Sophocles' tragedies who was nailed up by his feet as a baby (hence the swelling) but who survived to kill his father and marry his mother. See also FREUDIAN THEORY.

Oedipus,

King Oedipus of Thebes, mythical Greek hero.
oedipism - (1) self-infliction of injury to the eyes; - (2) manifestation of the Oedipus complex.
Oedipus complex - a phase of psychosexual development in which the child is erotically attached to the parent of the opposite sex and has feelings of aggression toward the same-sex parent.
Oedipus period - the time of a child's development characterized by erotic attachment to the parent of the opposite sex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Be that as it may, it is well known that an absent or imperfectly present, but known, father is more likely to give rise to acute oedipal conflicts than a constantly present one.
But it was the Oedipal conflict that appeared to preoccupy Spock the most, and he wrote about it regularly.
This progressive working through of Oedipal conflicts in adolescence is associated with an increasing separation from the parents and a growing sense of autonomy, which in turn represents a fundamental step toward establishment of adult sexual identity.
The new family tree: Lesbian, gay, parenting, boys, latency, oedipal conflicts, gender development, masculine identity.
In contrast, the rare and disturbing psychotic symptoms are a more plausible explanation for self enucleation than Oedipal conflicts or religious guilt," they stated.
The "worker's impressions" of this case were: "one suspects that [the father's] own needs in relation to Julie are intensifying her Oedipal conflicts .
The stronger third chapter deals with parenthood, as material state and trope, in Unamuno's work, and traces certain recurrent characteristics, including the absent or weak father, Oedipal conflicts, the strong mother, and the difficulties and pathologies of identity formation in their (usually male) progeny.
There is no possibility within the four-minute segment for regression to the Freudian Oedipal conflicts.
In a previous study, an American scholar has speculated that unresolved oedipal conflicts in Zhou's childhood may have accounted for the strong implication of latent homosexuality in Zhou's stage appearances.
s oedipal conflicts and his fears of the streets, the dark, and inhabitants of the ghetto.
Unspooling like a Freudian wet dream, complete with anal fixation, Oedipal conflicts, possible child molestation and a transsexual title character, "Agnes and His Brothers" reps a Teutonic version of "American Beauty" with added dysfunctionality.
The largely u9nconscious influence of the child's emerging moral conscience as a result of Oedipal conflicts helps explain why most of the societies studied by Thornhill require no explicit incest taboos, Spain contends.