Odonata

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Odonata

the order of insects which includes the dragonflies and damselflies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared to most other insects, odonates are large, easy to observe and identify, even on the wing.
Attraction of females or pairs to ovipositing conspecifics has been noted in other odonates (Jacobs, 1955; Waage, 1987; Martens and Rehfeldt, 1989; Rehfeldt, 1989; Michiels and Dhondt, 1990).
The larvae of several odonate species are provided with erect spines that protrude from the abdomen (Walker and Corbet 1975, Askew 1988, Johansson and Samuelsson 1994).
In addition, I did not check for sperm clinging to the male's genitalia when they were withdrawn [as occurs in odonates (Waage 1983; for exceptions, see footnotes 64 and 66 in the Appendix)].
Also Chakwal district possesses a wide range of aquatic habitats (including ponds, basin, lakes, streams, rivers and springs) that are common breeding spots for many odonate species.
The only odonate collected was the dragonfly Pachydiplax longipennis Burmeister.
Wilbur and Fauth (1990) compared the impacts of two even more distantly related predators, Notophthalmus and larvae of the odonate Anaxjunius.
South Africa has a rich mixture of tropical and temperate odonates and many of the latter are endemic and localized, such as the Malachites (Chlorolestes) and Presbas (Syncordulia) in the Western Cape.
In the Delta Marsh of Manitoba, Canada, hoary bats consumed greater proportions of odonates (dragonflies) and coleopterans, with beetles composing a greater proportion of samples than moths during June (Barclay, 1985; Rolseth et al., 1994).
1993), interactions among organisms in the same order (stoneflies, Peckarsky and Penton 1985; odonates, Van Buskirk 1988; salamanders, Fauth and Resitarits 1991), and interactions among predators from different phyla (odonates and salamanders, Travis et al.
These pools are typically small and apparently below the size that can support fish and/or invertebrate predators like odonates or dytiscids (Van Buskirk, 1988; Pearman, 1995).