OD

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OD

Abbreviation for overdose; optic density; Doctor of Optometry; Officer of the Day.
See also: absorbance.

OD 1

(ō′dē′) Slang
intr.v. OD'ed, OD'ing, OD's
1. To take an overdose: OD'ed on barbiturates.
2. To have or experience too much of something; overindulge: OD'ed on ice cream.
n.
1. An overdose of a drug.
2. One who has taken an overdose.

OD 2

abbr.
1. Doctor of Optometry
2. officer of the day
3. outer diameter
4. also o/d overdraft
5. overdrawn

OD

Abbreviation for:
Doctor of Optometry
occupational dermatitis
occupational disease
oesophageal dysfunction 
oligodendroglioma
Ollier disease
once daily
open drainage
operations directorate 
optical disk
organ dysfunction
organisational development 
osteochondritis dissecans
outside diameter
overdose
oculus dexter (right eye)

OD

1. Occupational disease.
2. Optical density.
3. Overdose, see there 3. Right eye–oculus dexter.

OD

Abbreviation for optic density; drug overdose.

od

(od)
A force assumed to be exerted on the nervous system by magnets.
[G. hodos, way]

OD

abbrev. OPTICAL DENSITY.

OD

Abbreviation for drug overdose.
References in periodicals archive ?
"When my supervisors suggested that I tape down my breasts, I asked 'Are you kidding me?'" Odes said.
In support of John Wallace's remark that an ode of Marvell exhibits the familiar seven-part rhetorical structure (exordium, narration, division ...) cherished by Renaissance pedagogues, Revard provides three facsimile pages from a 1616 annotated edition of Pindar that mark out this very structure (107-11).
Considerations of space and time prevent an examination of the third burda of The Mantle Odes; let it suffice to say that Stetkevych's translation and notes on this popular burda by Ahmad Shawqi, formally imitating the rhyme and meter of al-Busiri's Burda, extends the scope of her work to analysis of the particularly modern uses of poetry for political ends, combining powerful historical tradition with the ethos of reawakening that gripped the Arab world during the fading light of the colonial era.
In his literal translation of this ode, George Hils speaks only of "rustic ease" and "guiltless straw," not of a "Cell"; the liberty Vaughn took thus shows how Casimir's odes could be adapted to various poetic and religious sensibilities.
If we look at Odes 3.7 in terms of its function in the cluster under discussion, it responds directly to the specific social criticism of moral degeneracy reflected in the Roman Odes.
The French ode as it developed could treat diverse themes: politics, love, encomium, religious devotion, and more.
meanings, are more available to us if the odes are read and translated
It is interesting to remark that both have this note of intimacy, that the Psalms and the Odes, or at least the most familiar among them, are habitually referred to, not by their titles (for they have none), nor by their number in the series, but simply by their opening words.
For example, in "Ode to the Clitoris," she begins: "Little eagerness; / flower-girl basket of soft thorn / and petal, near the entry of the satin / column of the inner aisle; / scout in the wilderness; wild ear / which perks up; tender dowser, which points." Here, the clitoris is immediately transformed into the flower-girl basket brought to the wedding and the vagina to the inner isle where the union takes place.
The early and largest odes had 272-foot wingspans and date back to the Carboniferous Period when evolving trees flourished in vast forested wetlands.
(7) This is the conclusion reached by Helen Vendler, though she is unaware of Keats's debt to "The Phoenix and Turtle" (The Odes of John Keats.