Ocular neovascularization

Ocular neovascularization

Abnormal or excessive formation of blood vessels in the eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
D'Amico DJ, Masonson HN, Patel M, Adamis AP, Cunnigham ET Jr, Guyer DR, et al; VEGF Inhibition Study in Ocular Neovascularization (V.
Ocular neovascularization with retinal vascular occlusion-III.
sup][9] Many studies pointed out that miRNAs also played a key role in ocular neovascularization.
Ocular neovascularization and increased vascular permeability have been associated with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), a diffusible cytokine that plays a key role in the process of normal and pathologic angiogenesis1.
Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor plays major role in ocular angiogenesis and retinal edema production and is a step forward in the management of ocular neovascularization and retinal edematous pathologies.
Particular topics covered by the 13 chapters include pathophysiology and clinical implications of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-a signaling protein), signal transduction of VEGF receptors toward angiogenesis, growth factors and lymphangiogenesis, neural guidance molecules in vascular development, non-angiogenic functions of VEGF, contribution of pro-angiogenic hematopoietic cells to vascularization of tumor and ischemic tissues, antiangiogenic drugs as broadly effective chemosensitizing agents, ocular neovascularization, and therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiovascular disease.
Landmark research, the VEGF Inhibition Study in Ocular Neovascularization (VISION), found that Macugen slowed the rate of vision loss and helped limit the progression to more severe loss of vision in AMD patients who took the drug, compared with those who received a sham treatment.
Anthony Adamis, MD, associate professor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and director of EyeTech's preclinical development program noted, "Given the requisite role of VEGF in ocular neovascularization and the aptamers' high specificity for VEGF, this aptamer is a logical choice for the inhibition of choroidal neovascularization secondary to AMD.
In preclinical studies involving models of ocular neovascularization, concurrent inhibition of PDGF-B and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) signaling was superior to inhibition of the VEGF-A pathway alone, and demonstrated the potential to induce neovascular regression.
Gragoudas ES, Adamis AP, Cunningham ET Jr, Feinsod M, Guyer DR, VEGF Inhibition Study in Ocular Neovascularization Clinical Trial Group.
Ocular neovascularization associated with central and hemicentral retinal vein occlusion.