octave

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OCTAVE

Cardiology A clinical trial–Omapatrilat Cardiovascular Treatment Assessment Versus Enalapril

octave 

The interval between two frequencies having a ratio of two to one. Example: from 4 to 8 c/deg. Two octaves is a quadrupling of frequencies, and so on. Octaves are commonly used in specifying the bandwidth of the frequencies (e.g. spatial frequencies) to which cells in the visual pathway respond. See cycle per degree.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is held by American singer and composer Tim Storms, who has an amazing range of 10 octaves.
The live 4-hour "Ascension Workshop" begins with Mark teaching of the Octaves and our Path of Being towards our eventual Ascension.
So it sounded nice, and I was thinking maybe I would go and do some training again and probably sing an octave higher than what I usually sing.
The length ratio [L.sub.2]/[L.sub.1] is plotted on the horizontal axis, the B value is plotted on the vertical axis, and the [f.sub.o] range in octaves is labeled on the curves.
* Intervals: now try moving by thirds, fourths, fifths, sixths, sevenths, or octaves. Build them all from every diatonic step.
Slur Exercises, Trills, and Chromatic Octaves is a collection of technical studies for the guitar, which were used by Maestro Andres Segovia (1893-1987) in his own personal practice.
Editors' frontman Tom Smith came out on top in the study with a vocal range of 4.8 octaves, followed by Iron Maiden's Bruce Dickinson (4.3 octaves) and Led Zeppelin's Robert Plant (3.9 octaves).
The Mirus is available with or without octave and 1/3 octave band frequency analysis capability and will store a broad range of sound parameters across three measurement profiles.
Tim Storms has a vocal range of 10 octaves, and is a Guinness world record holder for having the widest vocal range and hitting the lowest note, G -7 (0.189 Hz).
It is also generally considered that the difference between written and sounding pitch is simply a matter of transposition; indeed, Richard Rastall discusses a number of the problem cases under the heading "Conventions of Transposition." (1) This is fine if--as several of the cases described here suggest--transposition is defined so broadly that it can vary from note to note, even within a chord, and that it can involve any interval up to two octaves, if not more.
Cehovsky compares this frequency structure to a melody that plays at different octaves. Lower octaves correspond to the physical, middle octaves to the emotional and psychological, and higher octaves to 'fine matter' (soul, spiritual essence, "the organization immaterial principle in man").
They can be used in either narrowband situations, such as a GPS receiver, or in an electronic surveillance system, where several octaves of bandwidth may be necessary.