Ockham's razor


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Ockham's razor

See OCCAM'S RAZOR.

Ockham's razor

or

Occam's razor

the principle which states that when a selection has to be made from various hypotheses, it is best to start with the hypothesis that makes fewest assumptions. It is named after William of Ockham (d. c .1349).
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In Section 4, I criticize her six examples, arguing that Ockham's razor favors my definition over her definition of extrinsic disposition, and that my definition goes well, while her definition does not, with Lewis's and her definitions of intrinsic and extrinsic properties.
In fact most of my review tracks many of the particulars of Hodgson's letter, such as the last paragraph in which he says Ockham's razor explains Moynihan's liberal voting record.
EUROPE'S finest aerial and acrobatic companies, The Mill, launches the 25th birthday season of Playbox Theatre tonight and tomorrow with Ockham's Razor at the Dream Factory in Shelley Avenue, Warwick.
Appealing to Ockham's razor, to model the number of dry days in January, the starting point would be a binomial model that has each day in January having a probability p of being dry, with the result of each day being independent of every other day.
Ockham's Razor holds that problems should never intentionally be made more complicated than they need to be: The simplest answer is usually the right answer.
WHEN Ockham's Razor first visited the Wales Millennium Centre I was completely hooked - and eagerly awaited the magical company's return.
Ockham's razor and the conditions of learning', The Reading Teacher, Vol 54, pp.
For me, the experience of finding the best solution reinforced that to teach is to learn twice--from following my student's guidance to remembering why I always need to keep Ockham's razor (4) in the top drawer of my own digital toolkit.
Perhaps this is explained by a principle used in philosophy and science called Ockham's razor, named after 14th Century Franciscan friar William of Ockham.
Many thanks to the poet and philosopher John Koethe for applying Ockham's razor to the Hylas reference in Wilbur's poem, and reminding us that Berkeley's "Three Dialogues" is the likely source of the allusion.
Instead, his speculations quickly go off the rails, as he is forced to rely on controversial interpretations of quantum mechanics, metaphysical conjectures about negative time "prior" to creation, speculations about alternative bases for life, and inconsistent and illicit wielding of Ockham's Razor in order to turn back the evidence for theism.