occult

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occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
The symbolic, or totemic, quality is not enough for some other occultists, however, as the third group of Lovecraftian occultists takes a more unusual stance regarding the nature of the source material.
Again, just as in Sonnet VIII, we may link the heteronyms to occultist tenets.
One of the tricks of the occultists is to lump into the single category of occult-mysticism all that is strange or as yet little understood.
Occultists, as Owen points out (2004: 239), argued for "the partnership of intuition and reason, acknowledging the role of imagination .
Paganism in the broadest sense goes back to the Stone Age, but neopaganism is a product of the last 100 years, born when various mystics, most notably the English occultist Gerald Gardner, assembled new spiritual movements out of several preexisting social currents, from Freemasonry to woodcraft groups.
Archaeological expert Dr Kasper Brecht said the occultists alleged that during the rite the Devil himself appeared and left the pitchfork behind.
On one level, the imaginary occultists, recluses, obsessives, and sociopaths who inhabit Nelson's reef are types one would really like to avoid.
We now have the remarkable phenomenon of historically ignorant atheists or occultists who look wistfully back to a pastoral eastern Eden or Atlantis, talk about nothing being new under the sun, are miserably pessimistic whenever they read the newspapers, and yet assert that it will not be long before technology wipes every tear from every eye.
But Hughes and Plath, and indeed their whole Cambridge circle, were occultists, half-believers in Ouija, Tarot, astrology, etc.
Just like the consumers, advertisers who want to reach occultists have difficulty reaching this fragmented market," he said.
Southbrook Road derives its name from Childwall Brook, which once ran through the road on which 34 houses are now built, and the house which is purported to be the lair of the demon is situated on land which once belonged to the Ivy Farm -just one of the infamous spots where a sinister and ancient band of occultists known as the Lily White Boys used to hold their bonfire rituals.
So much so that Ireland is one of the most visited countries by occultists and spiritual mediums.