occult

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occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Three have already taken place in 2019, two of which - stellar occultations by Europa (4 June) and Callisto (5 June) - were also observed by the researchers, and for which the data are still under analysis.
In North America the current lunar occultation won't look like much.
Owing to the uncertainties involved in predicting events, an occultation was not expected, but a disappearance of 6.05 seconds was recorded by video.
An occultation happens at different times as seen from different places.
It is with great sadness that I report that Section member Pawel Maksym from Poland died prematurely at the age of 29 during a surgical operation on 2013 February 13: a great loss to the worldwide amateur astronomy community as Pawel was a keen occultation observer and an inspiration to all who knew him.
The shadow of the second occultation passed over several large telescopes atop Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
For the second occultation on July 10, the researchers will also enlist NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy.
Pawel Maksym was a 29-year-old amateur astronomer from Poland who was very active within the International Occultation Timing Association, European Section (IOTA-ES) and an enthusiastic participant at the annual European Symposium on Occultation Projects (ESOP) conferences, presenting a talk each year and taking part in lively discussions in the lecture theatre, on trips, and in the bar.
* (5038) Overbeek: Named for Michiel Daniel Overbeek (1920 Sep 15-2001 Jul 19), prolific variable star & occultation observer, ASSA President (1961 & 1999) and Gill Medalist (1984).
Observations of a stellar occultation by Pluto from five sites in Australia were analyzed to constrain Pluto's atmospheric properties.
Alcock and his colleagues propose to use cameras mounted on a trio of telescopes spaced a few kilometers apart to distinguish stellar occultations from mere twinklings due to atmospheric turbulence.