occult


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Related to occult: Satanism, occult fracture

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
References in periodicals archive ?
The occult lurks relatively unexplored in a great deal of modern and postmodern poetry.
Finally, Levenda makes another central argument in support of an even deeper bond between racism itself and the occult, claiming that racism, in modern Europe, had its roots firmly planted in occultism.
Enter into search engines such words as teen cults, Satanism, witchcraft, and occult, and the number of emerging web sites will be exhaustive.
Further, Occult number of A.B Vajpayee is 31 (3+1=4) .
Occult spinal dysraphic disorders such as lipomyelocele are an uncommon but clinically important diagnosis in the pediatric patient population due to the high risk of significant neurologic impairment.
In the past two decades, the academic study of magic, alchemy, and the occult has evolved from the obscure pursuits of a few brave scholars into a vibrant subfield, drawing in scholars of literature, historians of science, church historians, and art historians, among others.
SAN FRANCISCO -- Occult uterine sarcoma occurred in less than 0.1% of more than 10,000 hysterectomies performed at a large hospital system between 2000 and 2014 for presumed benign gynecologic indications.
If not, then with a 1 in 154 to 1 in 31 risk of occult malignancy, should not all women 50 years and older with fibroids undergo hysterectomy for this occult risk?
Objectives: To determine the frequency of occult (node negative) cervical lymph node metastasis in primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, using contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT).
Jupiter's four Galilean satellites will continue to eclipse and occult each other for the next several months.
Occult Knowledge, Science, and Gender on the Shakespearean Stage, by Mary Floyd-Wilson.