occlusive dressing

(redirected from Occlusive dressings)

oc·clu·sive dress·ing

a dressing that hermetically seals a wound.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

occlusive dressing

Wound care A dressing that seals a wound to preventing contact with air or moisture
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

oc·clu·sive dress·ing

(ŏ-klū'siv dres'ing)
Bandage that hermetically seals a wound.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C), Honey dressing Negative pressure wound treatment, Diabetic foot, and Occlusive dressings.
Risk factors for delayed wound healing from Candida wound infections included occlusive dressings and treatment with antibacterial ointments [4, 5].
A review of the CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed databases for 2012-2105 was conducted using the search terms chest tubes, occlusive dressings, occlusive petroleum dressings, and dry sterile dressings.
Four patients expired from the emboli, one of whom had a cerebrovascular accident, and none of them had occlusive dressings at the air entry sites.
Occlusive dressings called chest seals are fairly easy to use and effective for sealing penetrating chest trauma.
The skin was covered with petroleum jelly and occlusive dressings. An appropriate fluid therapy was initiated.
The most widely accepted theory on silicone's mechanism of action is that it improves hydration of the skin by decreasing water vapor loss because it serves as an occlusive dressing. (11,12) Studies have shown water vapor loss from skin covered with silicone (and other occlusive dressings) is half that of normal skin.
Eighty-four percent of respondents reported that the only adverse events from vaccination were related to the skin irritation caused by the occlusive dressings worn over the vaccination lesion.
It comprises treatment with wet compresses, hydrophilic occlusive dressings, antimicrobial agents and topical corticosteroids [2].
A recent review on the use of occlusive dressings (wet or dry) found little beneficial evidence for their use, but noted that the studies were of poor quality.
The dermatological approach relied on advanced occlusive dressings in order to minimize the possibility that the patient would manipulate the skin lesion.
* Explain to athletes with herpes or bacterial infections that they cannot participate while the lesions are active, even if they are covered with occlusive dressings. (C)