maternal death

(redirected from Obstetric death)

ma·ter·nal death

death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days after the termination of gestation, irrespective of the duration and site of pregnancy and the cause of death; two periods are recognized in the 42-day interval: period one includes day 1-day 7; period two includes day 8- day 42. Maternal deaths are further classified as: direct maternal death, death resulting from obstetric complications of the gestation, labor, or puerperium, and from interventions, omissions, incorrect treatment, or a chain of events caused by any of the above; indirect maternal death, an obstetric death resulting from previously existing disease or from disease developing during pregnancy, labor, or the puerperium; it is not directly due to obstetric causes, but to conditions aggravated by the physiologic effects of pregnancy.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

maternal death

As defined in the UK, death of the mother during pregnancy or within 6 weeks of delivery (late maternal death encompasses up to 1 year post delivery), which is divided into direct causes (e.g., pulmonary embolus, eclampsia) and indirect cause (e.g., cardiovascular disease, suicide, diabetes).

Risk factors for maternal death
Social disadvantage, poverty, minority ethnic group, late booking/poor attendance, obesity, domestic violence, substance abuse, suboptimal clinical care, lack of interprofessional/ interagency communication.

Direct causes of maternal death
Thromboembolism (most direct common cause), hypertensive disease of pregnancy (pre-eclampsia and eclampsia), haemorrhage, amniotic fluid embolism, deaths in early pregnancy (ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous miscarriage, abortion), genital tract sepsis, genital tract trauma, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, anaesthesia-related.

Indirect causes of maternal death
Suicide (most common indirect cause), cardiac, CNS haemorrhage, epilepsy, infections, malignancy.

Coincidental maternal death
RTA/MVA.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ma·ter·nal death

(mă-tĕrnăl deth)
Demise of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days after the termination of gestation, irrespective of the duration and site of pregnancy and the cause of death.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(14,15) APH is our third most common cause of obstetric death; 24 cases (60%) were directly classified as abruptio placentae without hypertension.
One was a death that occurred more than a year after the pregnancy had ended, and although it was an obstetric death, it was excluded because it occurred after one year.
There were 04 (2.4%) cardiac maternal deaths and no obstetric deaths as shown by table 1.out of all patients 80 (47%) delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery, 25 (15%) by instrumental delivery and 65 (38%) by cesarean section.
Results: The total obstetric deaths during the study period were 54.
There were 48 obstetric deaths documented during the study period (mortality rate 34.8%).
"Because the majority of pregnancy-associated deaths were not related to pregnancy, it is important to focus also on [deaths] other than obstetric deaths," they assert.
Direct obstetric deaths are "those resulting from obstetric complications of the pregnant state (Pregnancy, labour and puerperium) from interventions, omissions, incorrect treatment or from a chain of events resulting from any of the above."
Al, (9) reported 73.19% as direct obstetric deaths of which haemorrhage 43.16%, hypertension33.09%, sepsis 12.67%, 26.8% were indirect cause with anaemia as leading cause; while Purialka, (10) and group reported sepsis 43.05% as leading cause followed by haemorrhage and eclampsia 22.22% and 31.94% respectively.
The lion's share of maternal deaths is attributable to direct causes like haemorrhage, eclampsia, infection (sepsis) and Indirect obstetric deaths result from previously existing disease or disease that developed during pregnancy not directly due to obstetric causes but are aggravated by the physiologic effects of pregnancy.
Forty-five percent of women died within 24 hours of admission, direct obstetric deaths occurred in 55.39% (72/130), indirect obstetric deaths in 40% (52/130), and deaths due to unrelated causes in 4.61% (6/130).