oblique fissure of lung

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ob·lique fis·sure of lung

[TA]
the deep fissure in each lung that runs obliquely downward and forward. It divides the upper and lower lobes of the left lung and separates the upper and middle lobes from the lower lobe of the right lung.

oblique fissure of lung

In each lung, the deep groove separating the bottom and side of the upper lobe from the top and side of the lower lobe.
See also: fissure
References in periodicals archive ?
Right lung consists of three lobes-upper, middle, and lower-separated by horizontal and oblique fissures, while the left consists of two lobes-upper and lower-separated by an oblique fissure.
Duplicate caudate lobe of liver with oblique fissure and hypoplastic left lobe of liver.
The left lung is divided into two lobes by an oblique fissure. Additional fissures occasionally occur, although they are usually short (Hollinshead, 1971; Bergman et al., 1988; Arai & Shiozawa, 1992; Murakami, 2000).
In the present case, the right lung had a horizontal fissure posterior to the oblique fissure (Fig.
CT scan showed right sided pleural effusion with pocket mainly in lateral aspect and in the oblique fissure, multiple gas bubbles with air fluid levels, and partial atelectasis of right middle and lower lobes that are medially displaced (Figure 2).
Caption: Figure 2: Chest CT scan right sided pleural effusion with pocket mainly in lateral aspect and in the oblique fissure, multiple gas bubbles with air fluid levels (black arrow), and partial atelectasis of right middle and lower lobes that are medially displaced (white arrow).
There were 2 (20%) mediastinal hydatid, 2 (20%) diaphragmatic, 2 (20%) pericardial, 2 (20%) oblique fissure, and 1 (10%) each in chest wall and pleural hydatid in our study.
Lateral chest radiography helps appreciate the movement of oblique fissures. For instance, forward movement of the oblique fissure in left upper lobe atelectasis becomes apparent on a lateral chest radiograph.
Showing a tongue like projection separated by an oblique fissure. B.
No exact information is available on what actually triggers the acute inflammatory process within the cavernous sinus/superior oblique fissure. Thus, the syndrome can be taken as a manifestation of idiopathic orbital inflammation (Pseudotumor).
The oblique fissure runs downwards, thereby meeting the inferior border of the lung at a distance of approximately 7.5 cm behind anterior end (Standring).
The horizontal fissure is reported to pass from the oblique fissure at the level of midaxillary line to the anterior border of the lung at the level of sternal end of fourth costal cartilage (Standring).