objective

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objective

 [ob-jek´tiv]
1. perceptible by the external senses.
2. a clear, concise declarative statement that directs action toward a specific goal.
3. the lens or system of lenses of a microscope nearest the object that is being examined.
achromatic objective one in which the chromatic aberration is corrected for two colors and the spherical aberration for one color.
affective objective a statement of expectations regarding changes in attitude or feelings.
apochromatic objective one in which chromatic aberration is corrected for three colors and the spherical aberration for two colors.
behavioral objective a written statement identifying an action or pattern of actions to be expected after an intervention.
cognitive objective a statement of expectations regarding knowledge.
flat field objective a microscopic objective that provides an image in which all parts of the field are simultaneously in focus.
immersion objective one designed to have its tip and the coverglass over the specimen connected by a liquid instead of air.
psychomotor objective a statement of expectations regarding the acquisition of skills.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ob·jec·tive

(ob-jek'tiv),
1. The lens or lenses in the object end of the body tube of a microscope, by means of which the rays coming from the object examined are brought to a focus. Synonym(s): object glass
2. Viewing events or phenomena as they exist in the external world, impersonally, or in an unprejudiced way; open to observation by oneself and by others. Compare: subjective.
[L. ob- jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

objective

(əb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Based on observable phenomena; empirical.
2. Relating to or being an indicator of disease, such as a physical sign, laboratory test, or x-ray, that can be observed or verified by someone other than the person being evaluated.

ob·jec′tive·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

objective

EBM
A generic term referring to the central reason for performing a trial, which is to answer scientific questions by analysing data collected during the trial.
The primary objective is the main question to be answered and drives any statistical planning for the trial—e.g., calculating the sample size to provide the appropriate power for statistical testing; secondary objectives are goals of a trial that will provide further information on the use of the treatment.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

objective

adjective Referring to the perception of external events or phenomena in an impartial, impersonal, and unbiased fashion noun Vox populi A goal; the reason for doing a thing. See Treatment objective.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
1. The lens or lenses in the lower end of the body tube of a microscope.
2. Pertaining to facts, conditions, or phenomena as they actually exist, without distortion by personal viewpoint or prejudice; open to observation by oneself and by others.
Compare: subjective
3. A goal, as in a desired outcome of treatment.
4. A component of a SOAP note format of medical records.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

objective

The lens in a microscope nearest to the object being examined.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Objective 

An optical system or a lens used to provide a real image of an object. In cameras this image is situated on the film but in viewing instruments (telescopes, microscopes, etc.) this image is seen through an eyepiece. Syn. objective lens. See numerical aperture.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ob·jec·tive

(ŏb-jek'tiv)
Lens or lenses in object end of the body tube of a microscope by means of which rays coming from object examined are brought to a focus.
[L. ob-jicio, pp. -jectus, to throw before]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The company also offers an 800 number for supervisors to call to get an objective point of view on how to handle sensitive employee management issues.
Before Geiger, an intentional conversion which necessarily injured a creditor was willful and malicious, even without a showing that the debtor intended injury.(38) However, for the past year since Geiger was decided, courts have required creditors to prove that their debtors either converted collateral with intent to injure or converted collateral with knowledge that injury was substantially certain to result.(39) As noted by one Florida court, it is no longer sufficient to show that the debtor's conversion was substantially certain, from an objective point of view, to cause injury.(40)
Together, rationality and integrity bring a certain clarity and set of standards to human existence, allowing the human being to gain an objective point of orientation in life free from the unexamined dictates of mere self, interest and day-to-day existence.
If the task force and AcSEC believe that some technological feasibility criteria must be met before software costs can be capitalized, they will be challenged to determine an effective, objective point in the software creation process when development risk ceases.
Rather, the defendants must show from an objective point of view that the reviewers' conclusions were reasonable.
If we could elude our pursuers and make it to "Freedom Village"--the objective point at the other end of the valley--before the hour allotted for evasion was up, we'd be rewarded with some food and a little rest.
Advice on legal matters like estate planning should be taken from an objective point of view.
Andrew Sivertsen, solicitor for the Coles family, said: "I would like the police to look at this case with fresh eyes and from an objective point of view in light of the criticism that's been levelled at certain police officers in South Yorkshire Police.
Modern language technologies with numerical and measurable data enable an objective point of view to the subject on MT quality.
Marc Willers, representing the residents, told a judge: "It is the unprecedented siting of a military base or missile site in peace time on English soil that brings us to this court." He said of the residents: "They have a fully justified fear that installation or deployment of the missile system on the roof of the Fred Wigg Tower gives rise to the additional risk that the tower itself may become the focus of a terrorist attack." Willers said the Ministry of Defence (MoD) was suggesting the fear was unjustified when one looked at it from an objective point of view.
London, June 13 ( ANI ): A new iPhone app allows uncertain girlfriends to review their feelings towards their boyfriend from an objective point of view.