object relations

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object relations

an emotional bond between one person and another, as contrasted with interest in and love for the self. It is usually described in terms of capacity for loving and reacting appropriately to others. An object relation is delayed or not achieved in borderline personality disorders.

object relations

Emotional attachment to other persons or objects.
References in periodicals archive ?
We also hope to sound the resonance here with Winnicott's take on object relations theory, which we also address below.
Adolescence and Delinquency is less an attempt to apply object relations theory to a particular population than it is an attempt to illuminate the seamlessness of theory and application.
From attachment theory (Bowlby, 1969) and object relations theory (Winnicott, 1965; Cashdan, 1988), these comments demonstrate that teachers, at least from an emotional perspective, are in a role similar to that of a parent within the narrower context of the classroom.
In this way, the concept of materialisation is a less modern and more inclusive discussion of the social phenomenon of environmental participation described by object relations theory as internalisation and externalisation.
This complex article draws widely on object relations theory to explain and analyse national identity, but the process by which the national/social is transmitted to individuals remains unclear--this could be a problem inherent in the theory itself, as she describes the process as 'inexplicable' (p.
A second and related purpose is to offer a new way of thinking about the son's and daughter's bond with his/her father, one that is theoretically rooted in object relations theory, analytic psychology, and John Bowlby's ethological attachment theory (1969/1982, 1973, 1980; Greenberg & Mitchell, 1983; Jacobi, 1953/1970; Jung, 1933; 1959/1968).
Based on object relations theory, such motivations are conceptualized as meeting self and attachment needs.
The basis of this more-balanced approach is the object relations theory, which Holmes borrows from recent post-Freudian scholarship.
According to object relations theory, adults who do not achieve a sense of object constancy may suffer from limiting forms of maladaption, affecting their ability to form and sustain interpersonal relationships (Kernberg, 1976).
Fitzgerald utilizes object relations theory to explain the "psychic trauma[s]" that the characters experience as they progress psychologically from objects to subjects and eventually to "reciprocal self-love.
One finds here as well an essay inflected by object relations theory that revises Freud's preoccupation with the father to turn its attention to the preoedipal mother (William Kerrigan on "female friends/fraternal enemies" in As You Like It).