Ober test

Ober test

(ō'bĕr),
test to evaluate a tight, contracted, or inflamed iliotibial tract; the patient lies on the uninvolved side and the involved hip is abducted by the examiner as the knee is flexed to 90 degrees; the hip is allowed to adduct passively; the degree of abduction or the production of pain along the iliotibial tract can assist in identifying the location of the inflammation or contracture.

Ober test

Etymology: Frank R. Ober, American surgeon, 1861-1925
an examination for tightness in the tensor fasciae latae, a muscle that flexes and rotates the thigh. The patient lies on one side with the lower hip and knee flexed on the table and the upper hip extended while the knee is flexed. Inability to place the upper knee on the table indicates tightness in the muscle.

O·ber test

(ō'bĕr test)
Test to evaluate a tight, contracted, or inflamed iliotibial tract; the patient lies on the uninvolved side and the involved hip is abducted by the examiner as the knee is flexed to 90°; the hip is allowed to adduct passively; the degree of abduction or the production of pain along the iliotibial tract can assist in identifying the location of the inflammation or contracture.

Ober test

(ō′bĕr)
Enlarge picture
OBER TEST
Enlarge picture
OBER TEST
1. A clinical test for tightness of the iliotibial band. The patient lies on the uninvolved side and abducts the hip maximally in neutral flexion. The examiner stands behind the patient, with the patient's foot resting on the examiner's arms with the thigh supported. The thigh is then released. The result is negative if the abducted knee falls into adduction. It is positive if the knee does not fall into adduction. The specificity of the Ober Test is improved by the use of an inclinometer. See: illustration
2. A modification of the traditional Ober test in which the knee is flexed to an angle of 90 deg.

Ober,

Frank Roberts, U.S. orthopedic surgeon, 1881-1960.
Ober anterior transfer
Ober exercise - developed to stretch a tight fascia lata.
Ober incision
Ober operation
Ober posterior drainage
Ober release
Ober technique
Ober tendon passer
Ober test - used to determine the degree of tightness of the fascia lata.
References in periodicals archive ?
To clinically assess the ITB length, physicians traditionally use the Ober test to evaluate hip adduction as an indirect measure of its length [18, 54-56].
Ober test and Trendelenberg tests were negative (refer to Table 1 for a summary of the relevant orthopedic examinations).
If the hip does not adduct with the weight of the leg, the iliotibial band is tight and the Ober test is positive.
Pretesting consisted of Trunk Rotation which indicated good rotation; Internal and External Hip Rotation which indicated excessive internal rotation of 55-60[degrees] and external rotation with hard endfeel at 40[degrees] with "clicking of the right hip when stepping over hurdles"; a negative Ober Test for tightness of the Tibial-Femoral Ligament; and a negative Thomas Test for hip extension without lordosis.
Ober tests these proposals in the rest of his chapters by weaving together his hypotheses, propositions, experimental models, counterfactuals, and theories with a narrative of the histories of the classical Greek world, focusing especially on Athens, Sparta, and Syracuse.