affirmation

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af·fir·ma·tion

(a-fer-mā'shŭn),
The stage in autosuggestion in which one exhibits a positive reactive tendency.
[L. affirmatio, fr. affirm, to make strong, fr firmus, strong]

affirmation

Etymology: L, affirmare, to make firm
(in psychology) autosuggestion, the point at which a tendency toward positive reaction or belief is observed by the therapist.

Affirmation

A statement of intention made as if it were a fact, which is a component of positive thinking. The affirmation concept was championed by Emile Coué, the creator of autosuggestion therapy, and subsequently by Normal Vincent Peale; Coué suggested that his clients repeat affirmative “mantras”—e.g., “…every day, in every way, I am getting better and better…”

affirmation,

n 1. in psychotherapy, reflection on one's positive qualities when confronted with a challenge to self-esteem.
2. a verbal component of yoga practice in which positive words are spoken by an instructor in order to assist an individual to leave behind subconscious negativity.
References in periodicals archive ?
155) Likewise, the Australian Constitution requires parliamentarians to take 'an oath or affirmation of allegiance'.
80) The Government Oaths Abolition Act 1845 (NSW) s l substituted declarations for all oaths and affirmations of office, except where an oath or affirmation of allegiance was required by law.
And be it further enacted, That at the first session of Congress after every general election of Representatives, the oath or affirmation aforesaid, shall be administered by any one member of the House of Representatives to the Speaker; and by him to all the members present, and to the clerk, previous to entering on any other business; and to the members who shall afterwards appear, previous to taking their seats.
Constitution reads as follows: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be vio-lated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The Fourth Amendment reads in its entirety: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The individual then signs the instrument or document and takes an oath or affirmation before the notary public as to such instrument or document.
11) The requirement of oath or affirmation raises no special problems where computer searches are concerned; however, the probable cause and particularity requirements pose unique problems where computers are the search target.
It mush be emphasized that perjury is the willful and corrupt assertion of a falsehood under oath or affirmation administered by authority of law in a material matter, the court said in its Jan.
Constitution (Fourth Amendment of the Bill of Rights) states: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The right oi the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
That amendment states: "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and: effects against unreasonable searches and seizures shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched and the persons or things to be seized.