bran

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bran

(bran),
A by-product of the milling of wheat, containing approximately 20% of indigestible cellulose; a bulk cathartic, usually taken in the form of cereal or special bran products.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bran

A byproduct of milled wheat, which contains ± 20% indigestible cellulose, acting as a bulk laxative; it has been recommended for cardiovascular disease, constipation, diarrhoea, diverticulosis, haemorrhoids and inflammatory bowel disease.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bran

Clinical nutrition A byproduct of milled wheat, which contains ± 20% indigestible cellulose, acting as a bulk laxative; it has been recommended for cardiovascular disease, constipation, diarrhea, diverticulosis, hemorrhoids, and IBD. See Dietary fiber, Oat bran. Cf Water-soluble fiber.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bran

(bran)
The outer coatings of grains, which are rich in nutrients and fiber.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bran

The fibrous outer coat of wheat grain normally removed in milling to make the flour more attractive to many palates. Bran is valuable in the treatment of constipation and other disorders of the large bowel.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The data were analyzed by age, sex, baseline lipid levels, and total soluble fiber intake with respect to change in LDL cholesterol to determine whether there was evidence of any unique groups of responders or nonresponders to oat-bran treatment.
Younger women demonstrated a poorer lipid response to oat-bran treatment than younger men and older women.
However, intestinal gas and looser tools were reported at a significantly higher frequency in the oat-bran treatment periods, and constipation was significantly greater in the wheat-cereal periods.
The 82% completionm rate of all subjects randomized into treatment groups and the overall adherence of subjects to treatment, with greater than 90% of both oat-bran and wheat-cereal servings consumed, demonstrated good cooperation of study subjects.
Although the mean LDL cholesterol reduction averaged 3.9% for the oat-bran treatement groups, the range of response ( -27.4% to +26.5%) is quite wide and suggests considerable individual variability in response.
Interestingly, that did not occur in the treatment groups supplemented with 56 g (2 oz) of oat-bran cereal.
[27] Thus, indirectly, the oat-bran effect on insulin reduction may be another pathway to lowering cholesterol.
Research on the oat-bran mechanism of action is also needed, especially in light of selective responder groups.
Oat-bran intake selectively lowers serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations of hypercolesterolemic men.
For those who can tolerate the same thing 250 days a year, have two oat-bran muffins, vegetable juice or sparkling water, and fresh fruit.
Anderson says decreased cholesterol is possible because oat bran maintains or even increases the amount of high-density lipids (HDL) in the blood--the "good guys" of serum cholesterol, in contrast to the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), the "bad guys." Not only do the oat-bran HDLs not collect on the artery walls and cause trouble the way the LDLs do, but they actually serve as scavengers, picking up the "bad guys" and removing them.