oak

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oak

(ōk)
A deciduous tree (Quercus spp.) that provides material in its leaves and bark to produce many forms of herbal nostrums. Used as an astringent, a therapeutic remedy for skin disorders (approved for use for this purpose in Germany), and countless other unconfirmed purposes. Because of high levels of tannic acid, it has caused death, respiratory failure, and hepatotoxicity.
References in classic literature ?
Here stood a great oak tree with branches spreading broadly around, beneath which was a seat of green moss where Robin Hood was wont to sit at feast and at merrymaking with his stout men about him.
A limited number of oak trees also will be available for sale.
[ClickPress, Thu Jan 03 2019] Oak chips white extracts Market Outlook Oak chips white extracts are the fine form of oak chips derived from white oak trees. The oak barks are collected and toasted within the granulated form, which is then used for fermenting the alcoholic wines and whiskeys.
Majestic live oak trees draped with Spanish moss and decorated with resurrection fern are emblematic of the romantic Old South.
This year, the distillery doubled its goal from 10,000 hashtags for 10,000 new white oak trees planted in 2017, to 20,000 hashtags for 20,000 new white oak trees planted in 2018.
Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is keen to plant more oak trees but first it needs to grow saplings from acorns with local provenance.
A NEW campaign to protect the UK's oak trees from threats including pests and diseases has been launched at the Chelsea Flower Show.
The proposals include the removal of two mature oak trees and one mature horse chestnut.
When I was growing up in Westley Road, Acocks Green there were two beautiful oak trees on land to the rear of where I lived at No.108.
Although the "replacement" ecosystems, such as those with red maple (Acer rubrum), can provide certain wildlife habitat values, there are negative effects of losing oak trees (Greenberg el al., 2011).