OA


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OA

Abbreviation for occipitoanterior position.

OA

ocular albinism.

OA

Abbreviation for:
obstructive apnoea 
occipital artery
occiput anterior
odontoameloblastoma
oesophageal atresia
oleic acid
oligoastrocytoma
open appointment, see there 
ophthalmic artery
option appraisal  
organic acid
organic anion
orotic acid
osteoarthritis
ovarian artery
oxalic acid

OA

Symbol for
1. Occipital artery.
2. Occiput anterior.
3. Osteoarthritis.

OA

Abbreviation for occipitoanterior position.

adaptation

(ad?ap?ta'shon) [L. adaptare, to adjust]
1. Adjustment of an organism to a change in internal or external conditions or circumstances.
2. Adjustment of the eye to various intensities of light, accomplished by changing the size of the pupil and accompanied by chemical changes occurring in the rods.
3. In psychology, a change in quality, intensity, or distinctness of a sensation that occurs after continuous stimulation of constant intensity.
4. In dentistry, the proper fitting of dentures or bands to the teeth or closeness of a filling to the walls of a cavity. adaptational (-sho-nal), adjectiveadaptationally (-le)

chromatic adaptation

A change in hue or saturation, or both, resulting from pre-exposure to light of other wavelengths.

color adaptation

The fading of intensity of color perception after prolonged visual stimulation.

dark adaptation

Adjustment of the eyes for vision in dim light. Synonym: scotopia

light adaptation

Changes that occur in a dark-adapted eye in order for vision to occur in moderate or bright light. Principal changes are contraction of the pupil and breakdown of rhodopsin. Bright sunlight has 30,000 times the intensity of bright moonlight, but the eye adapts so that visual function is possible under both conditions.
See: night vision; vision

occupational adaptation

Abbreviation: OA
A practice model used by the occupational therapist to provide strategies for interpreting and enhancing observed patient performance and for facilitating mastery for the patient over performance challenges.
See: conceptual model; occupational therapy

postural adaptation

The ability to maintain balance and remain upright during changes in position and challenges to stability.
See: control, postural

retinal adaptation

Adjustment of the rods and cones of the retina to ambient light.

occupational adaptation

Abbreviation: OA
A practice model used by the occupational therapist to provide strategies for interpreting and enhancing observed patient performance and for facilitating mastery for the patient over performance challenges.
See: conceptual model; occupational therapy
See also: adaptation

osteoarthritis

(os?te-o-ar-thri'tis ) [? + arthron, joint, + itis, inflammation],

OA

Enlarge picture
OSTEOARTHRITIS OF THE KNEE: It is especially prominent in the area above the fibula
A type of arthritis marked by progressive cartilage deterioration in synovial joints and vertebrae. Risk factors include aging, obesity, overuse or abuse of joints (repetitive motions, bending, lifting), as in sports or strenuous occupations, instability of joints, excessive mobility, immobilization, and trauma. Signs and symptoms include pain and inflammation in one or more joints, typically in the hands, knees, hips, and spine. The dominant side of the body is involved somewhat more often than the nondominant side. Affected joints become enlarged, lose range of motion, make sounds, or feel noisy or creaky. Diagnostic testing includes joint and symptom evaluation, including assessment of the location and pattern of pain and tests to rule out other diseases, including x-rays, joint fluid analysis, and blood tests. Synonym: degenerative joint disease ; illustration

Patient care

Treatment is supportive, using exercise balanced with rest and locally applied heat. Weight reduction, if needed, can ease joint pain and improve mobility; a body mass index below 24.9 is desirable. Aerobic exercise and flexibility routines can prevent joint stiffness related to lack of movement, and strong muscles provide better joint support. Swimming and aquatic exercises, which improve aerobic fitness without stressing joints, are encouraged. Meditation and other forms of relaxation may be beneficial as part of the patient's daily routine. Analgesics provide pain relief. Acetaminophen is the drug of choice, unless contraindicated. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are good alternatives for pain that is unresponsive to acetaminophen, although these agents increase the risk of gastrointestinal injury, bleeding, and renal failure. Other useful drugs include low doses of narcotic pain relievers, steroids, and intra-articular injections. Some patients, esp. those with osteoarthritis of the knee, benefit from joint bracing. If degeneration reaches the point where a joint is “bone on bone, ” joint replacement surgery usually is recommended, providing greatly improved mobility and function as well as pain relief.

OA

osteoarthritis

osteoarthritis

; OA; degenerative joint disease; osteoarthrosis inflammatory, degenerative joint disease, secondary to trauma within weight-bearing joints; characterized by focal destruction of articular cartilage, eburnation, hardening (sclerosis) and cyst formation of underlying exposed bone, osteophyte formation and uneven narrowing or frank loss of joint space

OA,

n occipitoatlantal, a region of the body located at the back of the skull. It is one of the locations in which fascial tensions may be found.

Patient discussion about OA

Q. Does GAG really help? My mother suffers from osteoarthritis, and after taking a lot of pain-killers someone offered us to try glycosaminoglycans. Does it really help? It’s quite expensive….

A. As far as I know it wasn’t proved in well-controlled trials to benefit the patients over placebo, so if it’s a consideration for you, I’m not sure it justifies the price. However, I’m only a lay-man, so consulting a professional (i.e. a doctor) is better.

More discussions about OA