nymphomania

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nymphomania

 [nim″fo-ma´ne-ah]
a former term for excessive sexual desire in a woman, which may lead to promiscuous sexual behavior; a form of paraphilia that is usually the result of a psychologic inability to achieve sexual satisfaction. Since the condition originates in emotional rather than physical disturbance, it is the underlying emotional problem that should be treated.

nym·pho·ma·ni·a

(nim'fō-mā'nē-ă),
An insatiable impulse to engage in sexual behavior in a female; the counterpart of satyriasis in a male.
[nympho- + G. mania, frenzy]

nymphomania

/nym·pho·ma·nia/ (nim″fo-ma´ne-ah) excessive sexual desire in a female.nymphoman´iac

nymphomania

(nĭm′fə-mā′nē-ə, -mān′yə)
n.
Unrestrained sexual behavior by a woman.

nym′pho·ma′ni·ac′ (-nē-ăk′) adj. & n.
nym′pho·ma·ni′a·cal (-mə-nī′ə-kəl) adj.

nymphomania

[nim′fəmā′nē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, nymphe, maiden, mania, madness
a psychosexual disorder of women characterized by an insatiable desire for sexual satisfaction, often resulting from an unconscious conflict concerning personal adequacy. Compare satyriasis. See also sexual disorder.
A popular term for a female psychosexual disorder characterised by a marked and promiscuous increase in sexual activity and intercourse with different male partners without falling in love

nymphomania

Female hypersexuality Psychiatry A popular term for a ♀ psychosexual disorder characterized by ↑↑↑ in sexual activity and desire, viewed in the psychoanalytic context as a reponse to an inferiority complex and/or a need for affection; the compulsive condition in a ♀ of recurrent sexual intercourse with different ♂ partners, promiscuously and without falling in love, but not as a paid prostitute or call girl. Cf Don Juan syndrome, Satyriasis, Sexual addiction, Sexual compulsivity.

nym·pho·ma·ni·a

(nim'fō-mā'nē-ă)
Older term for an insatiable impulse to engage in sexual behavior by a female; the counterpart of satyriasis in a male.
[nympho- + G. mania, frenzy]

nymphomania

Excessive desire by a woman for copulation. The concept of nymphomania is largely a fiction, engendered in less liberal days by male wish-fulfilment fantasy or by puritanical and censorious contemplation of healthy female sexuality.

nymphomania

behavioral state in which the female is in estrus continually or for longer periods at shorter intervals than is normal. Rectal palpation may reveal cystic follicles or there may be no detectable abnormality.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, nymphs and nymphomaniacs are both linked to prostitutes, who are connected to the urban environment; prostitution was closely linked to the idea of street-walking (Lee, 2013).
By looking at paintings of nymphs alongside descriptions of nymphomaniacs in the medical literature, I have outlined parallels of ambiguity and contradiction between the myth and the medicine.
Nymphs and nymphomaniacs are both victims and threats in their sexuality.
However, whilst Waterhouse's depiction of the moment before the nymphs' erotic abduction of a young man fits in with the idea of the sexually aggressive nymphomaniac, the pictorial range of nymphs in nineteenth-century paintings is large and inconsistent, displaying different expressions of sexuality.
Firstly, in order to investigate the nature of the relationship between nymph and nymphomaniac, I will establish that this relationship exists.
Having established a link between the mythical nymph and the medical nymphomaniac, I will now attempt to define and understand both as separate categories.
Similar to the nymph, the nineteenth-century nymphomaniac was a shifting and slippery concept.
Was Nymphomania the result of a shock caused by a dramatic event, such as Krafft-Ebing's case of Acute Deadly Nymphomania in which a girl becomes a nymphomaniac after being abandoned by her betrothed (1903)?
In this section, I will argue that the nymph's complicated status as both potential victim and potential threat is a central feature of her artistic depiction and that this contradiction corresponds to medical descriptions of the nymphomaniac.
Instead of contradicting the nymphomaniac, these nymphs are important in constructing a paradigm in which passivity and powerlessness can be part of a woman's "excessive" sexuality.