nutraceutical

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nu·tra·ceu·ti·cal

(nū-trū-sū'ti-kal),
A chemical substance or group of substances that for legal purposes is defined as a nutrient but that is in fact marketed and used for the prevention or treatment of disease.
[nutr-ient + pharm-aceutical]

Vitamins, minerals, amino acids, enzymes, botanicals (herbal medicines), and certain components or derivatives of animal foods (organ and glandular tissues) were classified as dietary supplements by the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994. This federal law exempts these drug entities from the safety and efficacy requirements and regulations that manufacturers and marketers of prescription and over-the-counter drugs must observe (for example, preclinical animal studies, premarketing controlled clinical trials, postmarketing surveillance). A product label may make health claims provided that it also bears a disclaimer stating that the product is not sold for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, or cure of any disease. For many nutraceuticals, little or no experimental information is available as to efficacy, side-effects, and drug interactions. Because these medicines cannot be patented, pharmaceutical manufacturers have little incentive to c conduct research on their properties, beneficial or harmful. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration must show that a nutraceutical is unsafe before it can be removed from the market. But because federal legislation provides no mechanism for the observation or mandatory reporting of adverse events such as hypersensitivity, hepatic or renal toxicity, suppression of bone marrow, fetal harm, or drug interactions, nutraceuticals are largely secure from federal ban. No federal agency maintains oversight or control of the potency or purity of herbal products. Random studies suggest that these products vary widely in potency (sometimes containing none at all of the labeled ingredient) and may often be adulterated with other agents or contaminated with pesticides. Surveys show that 10-30% of the U.S. population use herbal remedies at least occasionally, but that more than 50% of these fail to disclose such use during routine medical history-taking (for example, before surgery). More than 50% of amateur and professional athletes and bodybuilders use stimulants, protein supplements, and hormones. Among the more popular herbals are echinacea, garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, kava, St. John's wort, and valerian. Widely used agents not derived from botanical sources include androstenedione, creatinine, DHEA, glucosamine, melatonin, pregnenolone, minerals (for example, chromium, manganese, zinc), and vitamins. Virtually all these have significant potential for adverse side-effects or harmful interaction with other drugs.

nutraceutical

(no͞o′trə-so͞o′tĭ-kəl)
n.
A food or naturally occurring food supplement thought to prevent disease or have other beneficial effects on human health. Also called functional food.

nutraceutical

Any food or part thereof with medicinal or health benefits, which includes vitamins and herbal products.

nu·tra·ceu·ti·cal

(nū'tră-sū'ti-kăl)
A product derived from a food that is marketed in the form of medicine and is demonstrated to have a physiologic benefit or to provide protection against chronic disease.
Compare: functional food
[nutr-ient + pharm-aceutical]

nutraceutical

deriving from ‘nutrition and ‘pharmaceutical ’, broadly a food or part of a food that provides medical or health benefits, including disease treatment and prevention. Nutraceuticals range from specific nutrients, to dietary supplements, herbal products and processed foods and include beta-carotene, fish oil, garlic, green tea, oat bran, olive oil and various herbs. Sometimes called functional foods.

nu·tra·ceu·ti·cal

(nū'tră-sū'ti-kăl)
A chemical substance or group of substances that for legal purposes is defined as a nutrient but in fact is marketed and used to prevent or treat disease.
[nutr-ient + pharm-aceutical]
References in periodicals archive ?
Find out what your customers typically require for packaging of vitamins & supplements and functional foods & beverages by downloading this 2019 Nutraceuticals Market Assessment.
These insights are curated from the intelligence report, titled, 'Nutraceutical Excipients Market: Global Industry Analysis 2014-2018 and Opportunity Assessment 2019-2029,' which has been of late added to Market Research Reports Search Engine's (MRRSE) overarching armamentarium.
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Certified Nutraceuticals provides all services from the first brainstorming to manufacturing, filling and product launch, including logistics and disposition.
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Italians are first in the world when it comes to per capita spending on nutraceuticals. As Americans are embracing the healthy lifestyle, the supplements are a natural fit.
Speaking about the Joint Venture, Muthu Murugappan, Business Head of Parry Nutraceuticals said, "To start with, we will be focusing on extracting Phycocyanin from Spirulina.
Describing his research entitled 'Polyphenol-Enriched Plum Extract is a Potential Nutraceutical for Improving Muscle Strength in Ageing', Prof.
Health conscious customers drive demand in the Nutraceuticals segment
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Akin to cosmeceuticals, which are a therapeutic blend of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, applied topically on the skin to enhance beauty and prevent premature ageing, nutraceuticals refer to similar products that are taken orally.