Nurses' Health Study


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Nurses' Health Study

Cardiology A large cohort study that evaluated the effect of exogenous HRT on the risk of cardiovascular disease. See Estrogen replacement therapy, Osteoporosis.
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To understand this association, the researchers looked at data from 37,716 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 80,647 women in the Nurses' Health Study. After controlling for other dietary factors, physical activity, and BMI, the team determined that these sugary drinks were associated with higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as higher cancer rates.
There's a modifiable environmental component to the onset of this disease and a chance for some people to reduce their risk or even prevent RA." To conduct their study, Sparks and his colleagues used data from the original Nurses' Health Study and the Nurses' Health Study II, a second cohort established in 1989.
The study included 29,966 men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study and 63,412 women from the Nurses' Health Study. Dietary questionnaires administered every four years provided information concerning the intake and source of monounsaturated fat.
For the study, the researchers analysed diet questionnaires submitted every four years by participants in the Nurses' Health Study (88,301 women) and the Nurses' Health Study II (93,844 women).
The conclusion was reached after researchers followed up with 32,925 women from the Nurses' Health Study; 53,852 women from the Nurses' Health Study II, and 17,104 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.
For the current analyses, participants included over 55,000 women (ages 30-55) with high blood pressure from the Nurses' Health Study and 18,000 men (ages 40-75) who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.
Published in a special section on the Nurses' Health Study in the September issue of APHA's American Journal of Public Health, researchers found women who had low to moderate alcohol intake--up to one drink per day, more than three days a week--had the lowest risk of mortality when compared with women who did not drink or who drank substantially more than one serving per day.
The Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital are excited to announce that the Nurses' Health Study, for the first time, is now accepting both male and female participants!
These studies were the Nurses' Health Study, conducted from 1980 to 2010; the Nurses' Health Study II, which took place during 1989-2011; and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, from 1986 through 2010, involving 112,520 women, 112,919 women, and 43,703 men, respectively.
A study analyzed 3 decades of data from 83,349 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study and 42,884 men participating in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.
These studies were the Nurses' Health Study, conducted from 1980 to 2010, the Nurses' Health Study II, which took place during 1989-2011, and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, from 1986 through 2010, involving 112,520 women, 112,919 women, and 43,703 men, respectively.
Endometriosis is associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), at least in part because of one of its principal treatments--hysterectomy/oophorectomy, according to a new analysis of the Nurses' Health Study II.