number needed to treat

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number needed to treat

In a clinical treatment regimen, the numeric cohort of patients who must be treated to prevent the occurrence of specified complications or adverse outcomes of the condition under examination.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

number needed to treat

Decision-making The minimum number of Pts to whom a particular intervention must be administered in a trial or controlled study to prevent a single target event. See Absolute risk reduction, Odds ratio, Relative risk reduction, Threshold NNT.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

number needed to treat

The number of patients who must receive a specific therapy (or undergo a specific medical test) so that one of them will benefit. This concept is important in assessing the relative values and costs of interventions for specific illnesses. For example, to prevent one death from breast cancer, the number of patients who need annual mammography can be calculated. Similarly, the number of patients with cancer who will survive because of the use of a particular chemotherapy can be assessed. Generally, the smaller the number needed to treat, the greater the value of the intervention. This comparative information can be used to decide how to allocate resources, plan studies, or make recommendations to patients about their care.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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The estimated numbers needed to treat ranged from 60.8 to 6.3 in the lowest versus the highest quintile of predicted risk.
You can see the incredibly low numbers needed to treat here.
Therefore, the numbers needed to treat to save one life ranged from 11-20 patients.
Further research is needed to confirm these findings and to identify the numbers needed to treat to prevent one case from progressing from early to late AMD."
Adverse effects were more common in the treated patients, with numbers needed to treat to harm of 12 to 78 in the significant studies.
On an indirectly related subject, for any therapeutic modality, I think that "numbers needed to treat" statistics should be mandatory reporting for all drugs after they have been on the market long enough to gather such data.
On an indirectly related subject, for any therapeutic modality, especially drugs, I think that "numbers needed to treat" statistics should be mandatory reporting for all drugs after they have been on the market long enough to gather such data.
To provide perspective, the following discussion focuses on the absolute risk reduction and the numbers needed to treat associated with two preventive health measures that have been widely researched and endorsed: (1) preventing coronary artery disease by treating hypercholesterolemia and (2) preventing fractures by treating osteoporosis.
Patients were less likely to experience refractory angina when evaluated at 4 months and after 1 year when treated aggressively (numbers needed to treat [NNT]=20).
Second, a lot of clinicians have a tendency to enjoy numbers less, and so working with likelihood ratios, or numbers needed to treat, or absolute risk reduction sometimes seems a bit intimidating.