nucleic acid

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nu·cle·ic ac·id

(nū-klē'ik as'id),
A family of macromolecules, of molecular masses ranging upward from 25,000, found in the chromosomes, nucleoli, mitochondria, and cytoplasm of all cells, and in viruses; in complexes with proteins, they are called nucleoproteins. On hydrolysis they yield purines, pyrimidines, phosphoric acid, and a pentose, either d-ribose or d-deoxyribose; from the last, the nucleic acids derive their more specific names, ribonucleic acid and deoxyribonucleic acid. Nucleic acids are linear (that is, unbranched) chains of nucleotides in which the 5'-phosphoric group of each one is esterified with the 3'-hydroxyl of the adjoining nucleotide.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nucleic acid

(no͞o-klē′ĭk, -klā′-, nyo͞o-)
n.
Any of a class of large molecules that are polymers of nucleotides and are found in all living organisms and viruses. The principal nucleic acids, DNA and RNA, are the carriers of hereditary information and control the synthesis of proteins.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ic ac·id

(nū-klē'ik as'id)
A family of macromolecules found in the chromosomes, nucleoli, mitochondria, and cytoplasm of all cells, and in viruses; in complexes with proteins, they are called nucleoproteins.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
NUCLEIC ACID: DNA and RNA

nucleic acid

Any of the high-molecular-weight molecules that carry the genetic information crucial to the replication of cells and the manufacturing of cellular proteins. They have a complex structure formed of sugars (pentoses), phosphoric acid, and nitrogen bases (purines and pyrimidines). Most important are ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). See: illustration
See also: acid
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

nucleic acid

DNA or RNA. A very long polymer molecule made up of MONOMERS of either deoxyribonucleotides or ribonucleotides, joined by PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS. Nucleic acids constitute the chromosomes of almost all living cells and, by virtue of the order of the contained purine and pyrimidine BASE PAIRS, manifest the genetic code.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

nucleic acid

a molecule comprising a sequence of NUCLEOTIDES forming a POLYNUCLEOTIDE CHAIN. Nucleic acids act as the genetic material of cells and occur as either DNA or RNA.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Nucleic acid

The cellular molecules DNA and RNA that act as coded instructions for the production of proteins and are copied for transmission of inherited traits.
Mentioned in: Sickle Cell Disease
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nu·cle·ic ac·id

(nū-klē'ik as'id)
A family of macromolecules found in chromosomes, nucleoli, mitochondria, and cytoplasm of all cells; in complexes with proteins, called nucleoproteins.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Biological activity of recombinant Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus against Spodoptera exigua larvae.
Such defective variants in virus populations have been reported to adversely affect the pathogenicity of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) (Munoz & Caballero 2000).
Heliocoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF52 is a ChaB homologous gene involved in per os infection.
Comparative study on the susceptibility of cutworms (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) to Agrotis segetum nucleopolyhedrovirus and Agrotis ipsilon nucleopolyhedrovirus.
Amplification, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of conserved polyhedrin, lef-8 and lef-9 genes identified the pathogen, for the first time in Argentina, as a variant of Chrysodeixis includens nucleopolyhedrovirus (ChinNPV).
Starting from the second day after the infection, the number of larvae were recorded until death or pupation (the dead larvae showing significant symptoms of nucleopolyhedrovirus infection, such as swelling or loss of contact with or an inverted position on the pine needles, were recorded as deaths due to the virus; deaths due to other pathogens, such as bacterial and fungal infections, were not recorded, and the dead larvae were discarded).
littoralis (Tun-SlNPV) nucleopolyhedrovirus strain was almost identical with different GenBank deposited sequences of NPVs (Clem et al., 2013; Ikeda et al., 2013).
In some nucleopolyhedrovirus systems, the native virus tends to be more pathogenic to local populations than to foreign ones (Shapiro & Robertson 1991; Cabodevilla et al.
Sithigorngul (2009) Rapid and sensitive detection of Penaeus monodon nucleopolyhedrovirus by loop- mediated isothermal amplification.
Insecticidal properties and microbial contaminants in a Spodoptera exigua multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (Baculoviridae) formulation stored at different temperatures.