nuclease

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nuclease

 [noo´kle-ās]
any of a group of enzymes that split nucleic acids into nucleotides and other products.

nu·cle·ase

(nū'klē-ās),
General term for enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleic acid into nucleotides or oligonucleotides by cleaving phosphodiester linkages. For nucleases not listed here, see the specific term. Compare: exonuclease, endonuclease.

nuclease

/nu·cle·ase/ (noo´kle-ās) any of a group of enzymes that split nucleic acids into nucleotides and other products.

nuclease

(no͞o′klē-ās′, -āz′, nyo͞o′-)
n.
Any of several enzymes, including the endonucleases and the exonucleases, that hydrolyze bonds between nucleotides in nucleic acids.

nuclease

An enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond of polynucleotide chains and phosphate-deoxyribose bonds within (endonuclease) or at the end (exonuclease) of a nucleotide sequence (nucleic acid). Nucleases are produced by most biologic systems and usually recognise a specific substrate, such as single- or double-stranded DNA or RNA.

nu·cle·ase

(nū'klē-ās)
General term for enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of nucleic acid into nucleotides or oligonucleotides.
Compare: exonuclease, endonuclease

nuclease

Any one of several enzymes that break down NUCLEIC ACIDS.

nuclease

any enzyme that promotes hydrolysis of NUCLEIC ACIDS. For example, DNase, which catalyses the breakdown of DNA into individual DNA NUCLEOTIDES. The enzyme cleaves PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS of the nucleic acid. See ENDONUCLEASE, EXONUCLEASE.

nuclease

any of a group of enzymes that cleave or digest nucleic acids into fragments or single nucleotides.

S1 nuclease
a single-strand-specific endonuclease that degrades DNA and RNA to nucleoside 5′-monophosphates. The enzyme is a single polypeptide chain of molecular weight 32,000 and is isolated from 'takadiesterase', a digestive enzyme preparation from Aspergillus oryzae. Widely used in molecular biology to map the position of mRNA to its DNA, and also used to remove single-stranded tails from DNA fragments, to produce blunt ends to open up hairpin-loop structures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heat treatment of soil DNA at 65 degC for 20 minutes was carried out to inactivate nuclease enzymes.
High-frequency off-target mutagenesis induced by CRISPR-Cas nucleases in human cells.
Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.
Characterization of multidrug resistance 1a/P-glycoprotein knockout rats generated by zinc finger nucleases.
It is not excluded that this is due to the action of nucleases contained in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with asthma.
22 [micro]m screen filter (to retain particles and bacteria) or an ultrafilter (to retain nucleases and other bacteria by-products) for sequencing work.
Dana Carroll of the University of Utah recognized that zinc finger nucleases, engineered proteins reported by colleagues at Johns Hopkins University in 1996, could be used as a programmable gene-targeting tool.
Uropathogenic specific protein gene, highly distributed in extraintestinal uropathogenic Escherichia coli, encodes a new member of H-N-H nuclease superfamily.
Zinc finger nucleases have edited mistakes out of cells grown in the laboratory, but no one had previously reported success with correcting typos in an animal.
ENDOG belongs to the super family of nonspecific nucleases denominated [beta][beta][alpha]-Me-finger, although the catalytic moiety DRGH present in most members of this family (14) is modified in trypanosomatids since a serine residue occupies the position of the aspartic acid (SRGH).
Subjects addressed include: the rat as a model in biomedical research, genetic mapping and positional cloning, procedures for somatic cell transfer, the use of lentiviral vectors to obtain transgenic rats, generation of gene-specific mutated rats using zing-finger nucleases, and rat genomics as applied to psychiatric research.
The results of a mouse study provide proof of principle that a gene-editing approach using zinc-finger nucleases can generate a population of HIV-resistant human T-cells similar to those in individuals who carry the natural CCR5-delta32 mutation.