cardiac stress test

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cardiac stress test

An ELECTROCARDIOGRAM (ECG) test done while the subject is exercising, as on a treadmill. This may reveal evidence of relative insufficiency of coronary blood flow that would not show up on an ECG done at rest.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
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Among them, nuclear stress tests expose patients to radiation, which, with cumulative radiation doses, raises a person's risk of cancer.
In addition, the "warranty period" of a negative nuclear stress test has been reported to be 1 year in diabetics and 2 years in nondiabetics [31].
The second study, presented by Emory cardiology fellow Matthew Janik, MD, measured epicardial fat in patients receiving a nuclear stress test. The 382 patients had chest pain but did not have known cardiovascular disease.
This could mean you won't be able to undergo certain screenings, such as a nuclear stress test or a PET scan.
Generally, a test of the hearts function--such as an exercise ECG, nuclear stress test or stress echocardiogram--is performed for this reason.
The system is a noninvasive electrophysiology based device and is therefore significantly more cost-effective than other tests such as a CT scan, Nuclear Stress Test or Coronary Angiogram.
RADIATION DOSES: A COMPARISON Typical Equivalent effective period Number of Radiation source dose (in of background drest X-rays millisieverts) radiation (PA & lateral Background radiation 3 mSv 1 year 30 Chest X-ray 0.1 m5v 12 days 1 (PA & lateral) Calcium scoring 2 mSv 8 months 20 Chest CT scan 7 mSv 2 years 70 Cardiac CT scan 3-30 mSv 1-10 years 30-300 Nuclear stress test 10-40 m5v 3-13 years 100-400 Source: Ronan Curtin, MD, and Scott Flamm, MD, Cleveland Clinic
Some months ago, I had a nuclear stress test and pulmonary test.
The 75-year-old woman with fatigue, chest pain, and shortness of breath might be told she needs to lose weight, take antacids, and exercise more, while a man of the same age is more likely to get a nuclear stress test or CT scan of his coronary arteries.
A nuclear stress test uses a small amount of radioactive material that is injected into the patient.