nuclear receptor

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nuclear receptor

Any of a “superfamily” of soluble (non-membrane-bound) receptors for a constellation of physiologically active compounds (ligands), such as retinoids, steroids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, and hypolipidemic drugs. When nuclear receptors are activated by their cognate ligand, they form dimers, bind DNA and activate transcription of relevant primary target genes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings indicated that the drug zeroes in on mutated nuclear receptors found in cancer, leaves normal proteins alone.
Moreover, functional interactions between these two nuclear receptors may influence endocrine signaling participating in the progression of breast and prostate cancers.
The story for nuclear receptors is similar, with the most commonly cited proteins remaining the same over the last 10 years.
com)-- In the field of molecular biology, nuclear receptors are a class of proteins found within cells that are responsible for sensing steroid and thyroid hormones and certain other molecules.
Nuclear receptors activate genes in important biological processes in the human body.
The aims of this volume are to describe a range of molecular, structural, and cell biological protocols currently used to investigate the structure-function of nuclear receptors (a superfamily of ligand- activated transcription factors that act principally to directly control patterns of gene expression) and to discuss experimental approaches that may lead to new therapeutic strategies for treating nuclear receptor-associated diseases.
Nuclear receptors represent a very good family of protein targets for the prevention and treatment of diverse diseases.
Knockout mice that have deletions in two different nuclear receptors are being tested to see if responses to toxicants are mediated by those receptors.
This protein can bind to several other nuclear receptors to form distinct molecular complexes called heterodimers.
These gene families, which include G protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, kinases, nuclear receptors, phosphatases, phosphodiesterases, transporters, and proteases, contain the genes of greatest interest to the pharmaceutical industry as new drug targets.
Such nuclear receptors are even more ancient than steroid receptors, and they bind to molecules that are simpler than steroid hormones.
offers products and services focused on nuclear receptors for the drug discovery and biosciences industries.

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