Novocaine


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Related to Novocaine: lidocaine

Novocaine

(nō′vŏ-kān″)
A trade name for procaine, a local anesthetic. “Novocaine” is often loosely used to signify any local or topical anesthetic in discussions with laypersons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Only cocaine and novocaine, a liquid dental an aesthetic rarely used in public, turn the pads blueas the drugreacts with the substance cobalt thiocynate.
While preparing the patient for surgery, Nurse Debra Mills, an employee of the hospital, gave him an injection of Novocaine in his left hand.
He said in some cases, dentists even troll inner-city streets for children, promise them treats such as McDonald's Happy Meals, transport them to clinics and perform unnecessary teeth cleanings and drill lot cavities--"sometimes not even using Novocaine," he added.
Fairweather's comprehension of Spanish was improving; he understood that the doctor was asking the nurse for Novocaine, and that the nurse came back, rather breathlessly reporting that no Novocaine could be found.
Some parents described it as Novocaine on their tongues, and were concerned their tongues felt medicated.
Since then he has attempted a few more dramatic roles like Novocaine but has generally been typecast in comedy.
Youth and Young Manhood is the album and on it you'll find the singles Molly's Chambers, Holy Roller Novocaine and Red Morning Light and, also, a lot of tracks that appeared on an EP they released long before the album.
As he contemplates today's plush adjustable chairs and needles as narrow as a human hair, he's thrilled that the age when "they used a horse syringe" to administer novocaine is long past.
Charlie Chaplin, for example, was in A King in New York with Robert Arden, who was in Little Shop of Horrors with Steve Martin, who was in Novocaine with Bacon himself.
I needed twenty shots of novocaine just so the doctors could examine the wounds on my arm and back.
Novocaine Dark comedy film starring Steve Martin as a
The Internet is perfect for the jittery, multitasking young adult--but the gentle cerebral novocaine of television will never lose its appeal, and millions of people of all ages savor a leisurely morning in bed with coffee and two pounds of Sunday newspaper.