Nosema


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Nosema

(nō-sē'mă),
A protozoan genus (family Nosematidae, order Microsporida, phylum Microspora) with species (Nosema apis, Nosema bombycis, and others) pathogenic for invertebrates of economic importance (bees, silkworms); others are being studied as possible agents of biologic control of pest insects or other target invertebrates. N. connori infects human fat tissue, diaphragm, myocardium, liver, and other tissues of immunosuppressed people.
[G. nosēma, plague, fr. noseō, to be sick, fr. nosos, disease]

Nosema

/No·se·ma/ (no-se´mah) a genus of intracellular protozoa, including N. ocula´rum, which causes corneal infections.

Nosema

(no-se'ma)
A genus of parasites of the order Microsporidia.
See: microsporidiosis

Nosema

a genus of protozoa in the class Microsporea. All are obligate intracellular parasites.

Nosema branchialis, Nosema lophi
found in fish.
Nosema cuniculi
see encephalitozooncuniculi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Isolation of Nosema algerae from the cornea of an immunocompetent patient.
Colony-Collapse Disorder in honeybees has been postulated to be due to infection with the microsporidian Nosema (Higes et al.
In the case of Nosemosis, Nosema spores were found in seven apiaries with a total of 27 (64.
Apicultural practices driven by the economics of the industry such as transporting hives for pollination services, have contributed to the spread of Varroa and a newly arrived and possibly more virulent species of Nosema.
This definition has recently been revised to include low levels of Varroa mite and other pathogens, such as Nosema, as probable contributing factors.
They discuss Varroa mite tolerance in bees and the global status of various honey bee mites; the biological control of pests; protocols for collecting, preserving, analyzing, and reporting diagnostics aimed at bees and their microbes; viruses and their effect on colonies; the use of polymerase chain reaction and microscopy and antibody tests in the analysis of Nosema in bees; the effects of temperature on the incidence of chalkbrood fungi; the impact of small hive beetles; pesticides and honey bee toxicity, especially Colony Collapse Disorder; fungicides; the impact of bee disorders on crop pollination; calculating and reporting colony losses; and the conservation of plant-pollinator interactions.
Add to this significant parasitic stress from other new introduced pathogens such as Nosema ceranae, which attacks the honeybee gut lining; a whole variety of newly identified viruses and introduced secondary predators; and the small hive beetle, which targets weakening honeybee colony populations; and it is not surprising that the yearly USDA-spon-sored industry survey has recorded an average 30% loss of honeybee colonies in a defined window of time over the past several years.
Already, he said, there is some indication that the bees make a roaring noise when they have lost their queen, and become very noisy at night when they are infected by nosema - a bacteria that causes diarrhoea and that is thought to be responsible for the collapse of entire colonies.
Preliminary results indicate that we have the ability to identify the presence of some of the most common factors that impact on the health of a colony, such as the Varroa destructor mite and the Nosema apis parasite.
Varroa destructor mites and Nosema ceranae gut parasites can weaken and kill colonies.
Perhaps this is contributing to the susceptibility of the bees to strains of Nosema bombi and other bacteria or viruses?