Norwood procedure


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Nor·wood pro·ce·dure

(nōr'wud),
a complex procedure designed to treat aortic atresia with hypoplastic left heart syndrome; sometimes performed in two stages.

Norwood procedure

(nor′wood″)
[W.I. Norwood, Jr., contemporary U.S. surgeon]
Surgical correction of congenital underdevelopment of the left ventricle and the ascending aorta. The procedure is performed in three stages. An alternative to this procedure for children with severe hypoplasia of the left side of the heart is heart transplantation.
References in periodicals archive ?
But he came through it, he had the operation and came through the first stage which is called the Norwood Procedure.
Nationally, mortality rates for these nine procedures vary widely, from less than one percent for repair of a ventricular septal defect to more than 16 percent for the Norwood procedure, the first operation in a series of three used to treat a severe congenital defect in which the left side of the heart is underdeveloped.
Later this year, Liam will need to undergo the final operation in a series of three high-risk operations known as the Norwood Procedure.
Owen, she said, was born with left hypoplastic heart disease, which up until the development of the Norwood procedure to "reroute the heart's plumbing," was often fatal for infants.
The operation was the second of the three-stage Norwood procedure to get the heart pumping as normally as possible.
The new trial compared two techniques used in the initial riskiest stage of surgery, called the Norwood procedure.
Known as the Norwood Procedure, the aim of this treatment is to re-route the blood through the right side of the heart.
The operation is called the Norwood procedure after the surgeon who developed the technique.
However, she recalls the agony of first hearing her son's diagnosis and having to quickly choose among only three options available to a parent whose child is born with HLHS: 1) a heart transplant, which requires waiting for an available heart, and once found, bears the uncertainty of rejection by the body of the recipient; 2) "comfort care," which means no medical intervention and allowing the infant to die naturally; and 3) the Norwood Procedure, a proven-successful surgical option involving a series of three surgeries that can rebuild a congenitally damaged heart--ultimately, the option she and her family chose for her son.
This is known as the Norwood procedure and involves three operations of extremely high risk open heart surgery.
The neonatal cardiac unit was the first in the country to use a complex treatment called the Norwood Procedure.
If the Norwood procedure is performed to create a normal size aorta, a series of three operations will be required and his chances for survival will only increase to approximately 50 percent.