Normocytic


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anemia

Hematology A condition characterized by ↓ RBCs or Hb in the blood, resulting in ↓ O2 in peripheral tissues Clinical Fatigability, pallor, palpitations, SOB; anemias are divided into various groups based on cause–eg, iron deficiency anemia, megaloblastic anemia–due to ↓ vitamin B12 or folic acid, or aplastic anemia–where RBC precursors in BM are 'wiped out'. See Anemia of chronic disease, Anemia of investigation, Anemia of prematurity, Aplastic anemia, Arctic anemia, Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Cloverleaf anemia, Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, Dilutional anemia, Dimorphic anemia, Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia, Fanconi anemia, Hemolytic anemia, Idiopathic sideroblastic anemia, Immune anemia, Iron-deficiency anemia, Juvenile pernicious anemia, Macrocytic anemia, Megaloblastic anemia, Microcytic anemia, Myelophthisic anemia, Neutropenic colitis with aplastic anemia, Nonimmune hemolytic anemia, Pseudoanemia, Refractory anemia with excess blasts, Sickle cell anemia, Sideroblastic anemia, Sports anemia.
General groups of anemia
Morphology
Macrocytic
Megaloblastic anemia
  • Vitamin B12deficiency
  • Folic acid deficiency
Microcytic hypochromic
  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Hereditary defects
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Thalassemia
  • Other hemoglobinopathies
Normocytic
  • Acute blood loss
  • Hemolysis
  • BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Renal failure
Etiology
Deficiency
  • Iron
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid
  • Pyridoxine
Central–due to BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of senescence
  • Malignancy
    • BM replacement by tumor
    • Toxicity due to chemotherapy
    • Primary BM malignancy, eg leukemia
Peripheral
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hemolysis
.

Normocytic

A descriptive term applied to a red blood cell of normal size.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common type of morphological type of anemia diagnosed on the peripheral smear is the microcytic hypochromic type, i.e., iron deficiency anemia, followed by dimorphic and normocytic normochromic anemia in that order.
The 6-year-old patient presented to the emergency room with a normocytic, normochromic hemolytic anemia.
Red blood cell indices help us to classify anemias as microcytic, normocytic, and macrocytic depending on low, normal or high MCV.3 Most of the causes of pancytopenia present with normal RBC indices,4 but causes like megaloblastic anemia, aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria present with high MCV.5
Investigation of poikilocytic normochromic normocytic anemia.
As is evident from the table, the most frequent peripheral smear picture seen was normocytic normochromic blood picture (n=198).
Hematology revealed normocytic hypochromic anemia with neutropenia and leukopenia (Table 1).
She had a severe normocytic anaemia, with a haemoglfobin of 6.5 g/dL.
Blood tests showed an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 35 mm/h (reference 1-15 mm/h), normocytic anemia (hemoglobin 7.0 mmol/L [reference 8.5-11 mmol/L]), and eosinophilia (2.5 x [10.sup.9] cells/L [reference 0.0-0.5 x [10.sup.9] cells/L]).
Peripheral blood smear showed normocytic, normochromic red blood cells (RBCs) and no teardrop poikilocytes or nucleated RBCs.
Biochemistry showed markedly abnormal renal function (Table I) and a normocytic anaemia (Hb 7.4, mean corpuscular volume 90.0).
Laboratory findings on admission included a normal white blood cell count (median=13.8 cells/[mm.sup.3]) and features consistent with a normocytic, normochromic anemia characteristic of acute blood loss with a mean hematocrit of 27.1% (normal: 36.0%-47.0%) and a mean hemoglobin of 9.1 g/dL (normal: 10.0-15.0 g/dL).
The differential is entered as a percentage, the RBC morphology is entered as a single digit from 0 to 4, and the platelet estimate and platelet morphology are entered as 1 for decreased or microcytic, 2 for normal or normocytic, and 3 for increased or macrocytic.