nootropic

(redirected from Nootropic Drugs)
Also found in: Dictionary.

no·o·trop·ic

(nō-ō-trop'ik),
Denotes an agent having an effect on memory.

nootropic

adjective Referring to a nootropic agent.
 
noun Any agent—drug, functional food, nutraceutical or nutritional supplement—which is thought to improve mental function, including attention, cognition, concentration, memory or motivation, allegedly by increasing the availability of neurotransmitters, enzymes or hormones, and by increasing O2 delivery or stimulating neural activity.

There is little clinical evidence that most agents advertised as nootropics actually work as advertised.

nootropic

(nō″ă-trŏp′ĭk) [Gr. nous, mind + tropikos, turning, affecting]
Capable of improving or preserving memory, of potentiating learning, or of preventing cognitive decline or dementia.
References in periodicals archive ?
The patient was treated with nootropic drugs and mild rehabilitation treatment was started.
Mazanov also noted that nootropic drugs are "questionable." The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not review dietary supplements.
Because of these results and these considerations, the use of nootropic drugs, especially cholinergics, in RDs is understandable; the prototype of this class is piracetam, a derivative of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (Winblad, 2005).
Scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist, therefore has been used as a pharmacological tool to evaluate the effects of nootropic drugs on memory deficits in experimental animals (Smith, 1988; Egashira et al.