nonmaleficence


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nonmaleficence

 [non-mah-lef´ĭ-sens]
a principle of bioethics that asserts an obligation not to inflict harm intentionally. It is useful in dealing with difficult issues surrounding the terminally or seriously ill and injured. Some philosophers combine nonmaleficence and beneficence, considering them a single principle.

non·ma·lef·i·cence

(non'ma-lef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing no harm, based on the Hippocratic maxim, primum non nocere, first do no harm.
[non- + L. maleficencia, evildoing, fr. male, badly, wrongly, + facio, to do, act]

nonmaleficence

Medical ethics A central guiding principle of the ethical practice of medicine, first expressed by Hippocrates, and translated into Latin as primum non nocere, first do no harm

non·ma·lef·i·cence

(non'mă-lef'i-sĕns)
Ethical principle of doing no harm.
[non- + L. maleficencia, evildoing, fr. male, badly, wrongly, + facio, to do, act]
References in periodicals archive ?
Complex discharge situations in which patients have questionable decisionmaking capacity cause nurses distress as they feel torn between patient autonomy and the principles of beneficence or nonmaleficence (Bingham, 2012).
The four ethical principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice provide a set of abstract norms to facilitate ethical decision-making.
Childress in 1979, which provided the four principles of the Georgetown Mantra of Bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice.
DMK: As mentioned, the preamble now lists and describes six foundational principles for the ethical practice of professional counselors: autonomy (fostering the client's right to control their life), nonmaleficence (avoiding actions that cause harm), beneficence (working for the good of the client and society), justice (treating clients fairly), fidelity (being trustworthy), and veracity (dealing truthfully with clients).
Still others suggest that the moral principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence are tied exclusively to welfare and well-being.
If the examination of ethics seems a bit esoteric, breaking it down to its four core principles helps ground it in reality: autonomy, justice, nonmaleficence, and beneficence.
One of the most common ethical dilemmas is when patients refuse treatments or tests that providers believe honor their obligations of beneficence and nonmaleficence (e.
In simple words, this imposition violates the standards of justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence as it treats publicly insured women differently from privately insured women.
Administering sedation as a restraint to control behavior is in conflict with nurses' ethical responsibility of beneficence and nonmaleficence to the patient.
The students are introduced to the terms nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy and justice.
Evolving issues such as data sharing, computerized documentation systems, deontology, and utilitarianism were not addressed; only ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, fidelity, nonmaleficence, paternalism, and veracity were reviewed with students.
As such, their values will and should focus on secular humanism, including maximizing health status of individuals and the community and doing so with honesty, respect, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and similar values.