noncommunicable disease

noncommunicable disease

(nŏn″kŭm-ū′nĭ-kă-bĭl)
An infectious disease such as tetanus or botulism that cannot be transmitted from one person to another.
References in periodicals archive ?
3, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with cerebral palsy (CP) have an increased risk for noncommunicable disease, particularly cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to a study published online Aug.
A promise as an individual to get more active, say no to smoking or eat more healthily as a healthcare professional to save more lives or as a policymaker to implement a noncommunicable disease (NCD) action plan.
Because Egypt is in a transitional phase politically, the country is struggling with addressing the problem on nearly every level -- "from commitment to action to implementation", said Samer Jabbour, who oversees WHO's noncommunicable disease programme in the eastern Mediterranean region.
Health systems strengthening, communicable and noncommunicable disease threats, safety and quality of medicines and commodities, and health access and equity are universally challenging to ministries of health, public health institutes and multilateral organizations, which all need to function in a close global network.
Contribution of cause-of-death categories to the difference in years of life lost before age 50 for males Cardiovascular 8% Noncommunicable disease excl.
The conference aims at reviewing and adopting a set of monitoring indicators for noncommunicable disease surveillance systems, sharing strategies, tools and cost-effective interventions that countries in the Region may have implemented in relation to surveillance, prevention and improved health care for noncommunicable diseases.
"'We're expanding the notion of what 'noncommunicable disease" is," Dr.
At a time when the United States is trying to convince the rest of the world of our moral authority and seeks the cooperation of the world in the fight against terrorism, it would seem reasonable to reciprocate in the fight against communicable and noncommunicable disease worldwide.
He describes the history of the Russian and Soviet health care system; US and international health and social assistance programs during the early 1990s in Russia; the origins of the Eurasian Medical Education Program to contribute to addressing health challenges in Russia, through professional physician exchanges aimed at sharing understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and providing current standards of care to Russian practitioners; the development of the program from 1995 to 1997 beyond the initial concept; the program and its concentration on diseases, including noncommunicable disease, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS; its achievements; and how the program became an instrument of engagement in US-Russian relations.
"This evidence really shows that no country in the world can address health from either an infectious disease perspective or a noncommunicable disease one.
He became doubly convinced of this during his tenure as director of the department of noncommunicable disease prevention and health promotion at the World Health Organization in Geneva, where he helped fashion the Global Strategy for Diet, Physical Activity, and Health, passed by the WHO Assembly earlier this year.