nominal

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nominal

Cardiac pacing adjective Referring to a set of parameters which are usually values that adequately pace most patients; a pacemaker can be programmed to nominal parameters noun The value of a setting at which a device will operate optimally under normal conditions. See Cardiac pacing.
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It's just two and one-half times bigger in nominal dollars and one-third bigger in real terms.
Nominal dollar averaging calculates the net amount an owner receives during the lease term and them computes the per-square-foot net rental.
In contrast, under the Expanded Policy scenario, diversifying the electric-generation fuel mix, ensuring that the Alaskan natural gas pipeline is operational in 10 years, boosting LNG imports, expanding producers' ability to work in the Intermountain West and allowing natural gas production in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico and off the East Coast could yield a wholesale natural gas price of $5.47 per MMBtu (in nominal dollars) by 2020, the study found.
At first glance, the picture seems reasonable--state aid to K-12 education, in nominal dollars, was up 2.7 percent in 2002 and 1.7 percent in 2003, according to survey results from 49 states reported by the National Conference of State Legislatures.
As an alternative to making forecasts in real dollars, it is also possible to make all forecasts in nominal dollars and discount them at a nominal discount rate.
There's no doubt that buying a home costs a lot more than it once did in nominal dollars. In 1920, the median price of a new house was $4,700.
* The IHS Economics forecast of output growth in nominal dollars for franchise businesses will increase this year by $52 billion, 5.8 percent, to $994 billion.
Although oil prices have more than doubled since the beginning of this year to around $23 a barrel, average world crude oil prices are forecast to be $22.04 a barrel in 1998 dollars or $36 a barrel in nominal dollars by 2020.
The bill would authorize a 7 percent increase (in nominal dollars exclusive of inflation and GDP growth) in funding per year for the science and technology portfolios of 12 federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
(The Clinton balanced budget plan calls for transportation spending to decline slightly in nominal dollars. No one appears to be taking this plan seriously - not even the Department of Transportation.) And turning de facto control of the trust fund over to Shuster would be a "license to steal," according to one transportation analyst.