nocebo

(redirected from Nocebo effect)
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nocebo

 [no-se´bo] (L.)
an adverse, nonspecific side effect occurring in conjunction with a medication but not directly resulting from the pharmacologic action of the medication.

no·ce·bo

(nō-sē'bō),
An unpleasant effect attributable to administration of a placebo.
[L. I shall harm, fr. noceo, to harm, by analogy with placebo, I shall please]

nocebo

(nō-sē′bō)
n. pl. noce·bos or noce·boes
A substance that causes undesirable side effects as a result of a patient's perception that it is harmful rather than as a result of a causative ingredient.

nocebo

A negative placebo effect, which may occur when patients in a clinical trial of a drug therapy recognise (or think they recognise) that they are getting a placebo—i.e., not receiving therapy—and fare worse due to the effect of negative suggestibility.

nocebo

Clinical trials A negative placebo effect that may occur when Pts in a clinical trial of a drug therapy recognize–or think they recognize that they are getting a placebo–ie, not receiving therapy, and fare worse due to the effect of negative suggestibility. Cf Placebo.

no·ce·bo

(nō-sē'bō)
An unpleasant effect attributable to administration of a placebo.
[L. I shall harm, fr. noceo, to harm, by analogy with placebo, I shall please]
References in periodicals archive ?
It's hard to imagine that, given the power of the Rosenthal/Pygmalion, placebo and nocebo effects, that all of the stereotypes we've heard our whole lives about how people inevitably slow mentally with age haven't created the self-fulfilling prophecy of cognitive decline as we age.
Having strategies for managing nocebo effects can help clinicians better understand and treat patients who have complex medication complaints.
Becker, "Differential classical conditioning of the nocebo effect: increasing heat-pain perception without verbal suggestions," Frontiers in Psychology, vol.
The strong nocebo effect raises the concern of feasibility or even the usefulness of a DBPCC in clinical practice for the diagnosis of NCGS.
Neuroscience studies have found that the placebo and nocebo effects actually change the way we perceive pain in the brain.
The study, which involved around 10,000 patients at risk of heart and artery disease, highlighted a "nocebo effect" phenomenon that can turn expected bad outcomes into reality.
For others, however, the symptoms likely come from somewhere besides gluten or may be a nocebo effect, where a patient who expects negative symptoms becomes more likely to have them.
The opposite of the placebo effect is nocebo effect. It was introduced in 1961, starting from the Latin verb nocere, meaning "harm".
But there is also something called the nocebo effect. When this happens, a person taking the sugar pill or placebo reports side effects and negative consequences.
The contrary of the placebo effect is called the nocebo effect; as the former shows that the positive belief in a conviction can have a very beneficial influence, the latter proves the opposite: the "imaginary invalid" may be more difficult to treat than a real invalid (Bingel, 2014; Hauser, Hansen, & Enck 2012).
Redirecting Anti-Wind Energy, The Nocebo Effect and more: ajmag.ca/wind
In our study none of the doctors knew the concept of Nocebo Effect of Informed Consent (NEIC).