eutrophication

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eutrophication

 [u″tro-fĭ-ka´shun]
the accidental or deliberate promotion of excessive growth (multiplication) of one kind of organism to the disadvantage of other organisms in the same ecosystem.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

eutrophication

(ū-trŏf″ĭ-kā′shŭn) [Gr. eutrophein, to thrive]
Alteration of the environment by increasing the nutrients required by one species to the disadvantage of other species in the ecosystem, esp. in an aquatic environment.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

eutrophication

a process by which pollutants cause a body of water to become over-rich in organic and mineral nutrients, so that algae, CYANOBACTERIA and other microorganisms grow rapidly and deplete the oxygen supply.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
That plan was still in effect legally, though it was hopelessly out of date for addressing the region's current nitrogen pollution issues.
There have been many studies evaluating the economic efficiency of particular policy mechanisms to reduce nitrogen pollution, including taxes or levies on fertiliser (Lansink and Peerlings 1997; Bostian et al.
Townsend, an authority on how human activity has changed the natural cycling of nitrogen to create a friend-turned-foe dilemma, called for greater public awareness of nitrogen pollution and concerted global action to control it.
According to PREP coastal scientist Phil Trowbridge, among the major concerns is how increased development and nitrogen pollution is impacting a Great Bay Estuary that has been shown to be in peril.
Environmental technologies to treat nitrogen pollution; principles and engineering.
Nitrogen pollution, which causes excessive algae growth in freshwater, is getting worse in Wales at a time when it is holding steady across the UK, according to the latest sustainable development indicators.
In turn this would stabilise soils, so easing the kind of diffuse nitrogen pollution which is the bane of environmentalists.
When we consider the current law exempting agriculture from the level of scrutiny put onto small communities, numerous bodies of water will never see a reduction in the levels of nutrient pollution and nitrogen pollution.
The Packard Foundation recently announced a commitment of over $5 million per year over the next five years to seek ways to reduce the impact of livestock operation emissions and releases of nitrogen pollution.
On the other hand, farm animal numbers have increased over the past fifty years, contributing to a greater overall nitrogen pollution through manure.
The current layer under study is nitrogen pollution. It contributes to such problems as hypoxia, a dissolved oxygen deficiency that impedes the survival and reproduction of aquatic species.
For French-speaking Wallonia, Belgium argued that nitrogen pollution was largely domestic or industrial, and while the court accepted this, it said farming pollution was "by no means insignificant".